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Residents

0X30: New York City will be contributing zero waste to landfills by 2030. Take the Zero Waste Pledge!

There’s no “away” when we throw garbage into a can or litter basket. Trash goes into landfills, where it decomposes – sending methane, carbon dioxide and toxins into our air, soil and water. 0X30 minimizes this: By contributing zero waste to landfills by 2030, New Yorkers will be protecting our environment more than ever before.

The best way to keep garbage from landfills is by limiting the materials you use. Reduce use when you can – and reuse and recycle the rest. For example, opt out from receiving junk mail, and donate or sell items you no longer need.

Residential Collection: Schedule + Service Requests

Foam Products

Some products can’t be easily recycled. Case in point: expanded polystyrene, or EPS. Known as the foam used to make coffee cups, the Department collects more than 28,000 tons of EPS each year. Foam is lightweight and comprises a substantial amount of litter on our streets, waterway and beaches – and banning EPS cups, plates, containers and packing peanuts is the best way to keep this foam from landfills. In January 2015, Commissioner Garcia determined that foam recycling is not feasible. While a New York State judge has recently overturned the City’s ban on EPS, DSNY is exploring ways to keep this material from landfills.

How to Get Rid Of...

To learn the best way to dispose of products, scroll through the topics below or search by item:

 

Disposing Electronics

Because heavy metals are used to produce electronic equipment, under New York State law it’s illegal to throw away electronics with other garbage. Televisions, electronic readers, scanners, printers, digital music players and other equipment must be recycled by the manufacturers. Learn more.

Batteries

Cell Phones

Electronics

Automotive Products

Food Scraps + Yard Waste

Harmful Products

Other Household Items

Drop-off + Take-Back Programs

Carryout Bag Fee

Starting February 15, 2017, stores in New York City will charge customers five cents (5¢) for each plastic, paper, or cloth carryout bag provided by the store.

Learn more

Stopping Theft of Recyclables

When recyclable materials are placed curbside for collection, they become property of the City, and removing them is illegal. It’s theft.

People who remove and drive away with recyclables ready for collection in front of a residential, institutional or commercial building can face fines up to $2,000 – and the City can reward people who help us identify thieves who are fined.

Report Recycling Theft