Mayor de Blasio Signs Package of Legislation Increasing Accessibility in City Facilities

March 21, 2017

NEW YORK— Mayor Bill de Blasio today held public hearings for and signed 14 pieces of legislation– Intros. 1161-A in relation to requiring DOHMH report annually on immunization rates of New Yorkers for Human Papillomavirus; Intro. 1162-A in relation to requiring DOHMH to report annually on the use of contraceptives; Intro 1172-A in relation to requiring DOHMH to report annually on maternal mortality; Intro. 748-B in relation to amending the New York City charter in relation to drug strategy; Intro. 882-A in relation to requiring that a hearing loop – which helps people with hearing loss hear better – be installed in certain capital projects; Intro. 1280-B in relation to requiring NYPD to make collision reports available online to individuals involved; Intro. 1071-A in relation to requiring DOT to conduct a study of private streets; Intro. 1474-A in relation to lowering the tax on the transfer of a taxi medallion; Intro. 1475-A in relation to removing restrictions on the transfer of taxi medallions; Intro 873-A in relation to establishing a car-sharing pilot program that reserves some street parking spaces for car-share vehicles; Intro. 267-A in relation to requiring DOT to designate parking spaces in municipal parking lots for car-share organizations; Intro. 247-A in relation to increasing the fines for performing electrical work without a license; Intro. 820-A in relation to requiring DSNY to consider programs that would incentivize recycling in public housing; and Intro. 1198-A in relation to requiring DEP to publish a plan for reducing flooding in Queens Community Districts 12 and 13, and to report annually on progress.

"Hearing loops allow those with hearing loss to fully participate in daily, civic life. Intro 882-A will ensure appropriate accommodations are made in City facilities for those with hearing loss whenever the City does major capital renovations," said Mayor de Blasio. "Additionally, Intros 873-A and 267-A provide a new mobility service in City neighborhoods that will reduce the need for personal car ownership, provide greater access to motor vehicle use for the majority of New Yorkers who don't own one, and help reduce congestion on City streets."

"The slate of bills being considered today represent real opportunities to improve the lives of a dramatic range of New Yorkers," said City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito. "Reserving city parking spots for car share vehicles will reduce the number of cars on our roads and the amount of pollution in our air, while assistive listening systems in public spaces will aid hearing-impaired individuals seeking to remain tuned in to the world around them. Importantly – a municipal drug strategy and advisory council will go far toward combatting the overdose epidemic affecting so many local communities, and a package of healthcare legislation will provide valuable insight into reducing reproductive illness cases around the city. The wide number of issues addressed by this docket affects visitors and residents of every type, and I thank my colleagues on the City Council for their diligent work on what has truly been several collaborative initiatives and Mayor de Blasio for signing that work into law today."

Intro. 882-A requires that a hearing loop – which helps people with hearing loss hear better – be installed for certain capital projects.

"With this bill, the City of New York will ensure that more and more spaces every year will be truly accessible to those hard of hearing. Hearing loop technology makes such a radical difference in the ability of so many to participate fully in public life, and I'm proud that as a City we have moved to make it not just a priority but a requirement in our public investments. I want to thank the advocates whose hard work made this possible, educating me and other policymakers on the importance of this issue and helping us reach a path toward getting this landmark legislation passed," said Council Member Helen Rosenthal.

Intro. 1161-A requires DOHMH to report annually on immunization rates of New Yorkers for Human Papillomavirus.

Intro. 1162-A requires DOHMH to report annually on the use of contraceptives.

Intro 1172-A requires DOHMH to report annually on maternal mortality.

Intro. 748-B requires the City of NY to issue a biennial report on strategies to address drug misuse in NYC.

Intro. 1280-B requires NYPD to make collision reports available online to individuals involved.

"Today's signing of Intro 1280-B is a victory to streamline online access to collision reports. Prior to the launch of the NYPD's Collision Report Retrieval Portal, drivers involved in car accidents were required to appear in person at their local precinct to obtain a copy of the report. This often made an already stressful situation even more aggravating. Now, motorists can conveniently print that report from the comfort of their home, without interrupting their busy daily schedule," said Council Member Chaim Deutsch.

Intro. 1071-A requires DOT to conduct a study of private streets.

"I am pleased to sponsor Int. 1071-A which will require the Department of Transportation to conduct a study of private streets that are not within New York City's jurisdiction. Throughout our city there are many private streets that have been built on, that need to be identified, and possibly acquired. For far too long, these private streets have been overlooked and unfortunately so have the problems plaguing them. This study will bring the much needed conversation and action to assist those who have purchased property on a private street," stated Council Member Alan Maisel.

Intro. 1474-A lowers the tax on the transfer of a taxi medallion.

Intro. 1475-A removes certain restrictions on the transfer of taxi medallions.

"Today, I dedicate these 2 pieces of legislation to the more than 6,000 independent medallion owners who depend on its value to send their kids to college or buy a home. With the signing of these bills, we are taking important steps to ease some of the unnecessary restrictions that face those taxi medallion owners, which will make owning a medallion more attractive and hopefully spur much-needed investment in the yellow taxi industry. New York City's taxi and for-hire vehicle industry consists of a broad and diverse group of sectors that offer New Yorkers a multitude of transportation options and present drivers with more choices than ever before for how to make a living. The yellow taxi is an iconic component of that system and it is important that it remain strong and vibrant for years to come. I would like to thank Speaker Mark-Viverito for her leadership and support, and Mayor de Blasio and his Administration, especially TLC Chair Meera Joshi, for their collaboration and partnership," said Council Member Ydanis Rodriguez.

Intro 873-A establishes a car-sharing pilot program that reserves some street parking spaces for car-share vehicles.

"New York is home to more than 1.4 million cars, and as anyone who's ever looked for a parking spot in Borough Park, Forest Hills or anywhere in Manhattan knows all too well, it is a brutal and time consuming process. The research is clear that for every one shared car put on a city street, between 5 and 10 less fuel efficient cars are taken off. Car sharing programs have extraordinary potential to reduce road congestion, while actually growing the number of people who have access to cars, especially in the outer boroughs. The quality of life, economic, and environmental benefits of these programs are significant and I thank Mayor de Blasio for signing this legislation in to law today," said Council Member Mark Levine.

Intro. 267-A requires DOT to designate parking spaces in municipal parking lots for car-share organizations.

"Today's expanding sharing economy makes Intro 267A common sense legislation that would allow for the Department of Transportation ("DOT") to create a pilot program that would allow designate 600 parking spaces in municipal parking facilities, as well as on designated street parking spaces for the use of car-sharing organizations throughout the five boroughs. I want to thank Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer for introducing this bill many years ago and trusting me to steer it into passage. Also, I want to thank DOT Commissioner Polly Trottenberg and Mayor de Blasio for working with us to make this bill a reality," Council Member Rosie Mendez.

Intro. 247-A increases the fines for performing electrical work without a license.
"When electrical work is done by unlicensed contractors, both workers and civilians are put at grave risk of either fires or explosions. I believe that stiffer penalties are necessary to effectively deter unlicensed contractors from engaging in this work that could danger New Yorkers. In a city that never sleeps, it's imperative that electrical work is done by skilled, trained professionals. It is a matter of public safety, and I thank the City Council and the mayor for their dedication in passing this bill and making it law," said Council Member Elizabeth Crowley.

Intro. 820-A requires DSNY to consider programs that would incentivize recycling in public housing.

"We have an obligation to protect our planet for future generations and one of the easiest ways to do that is to be mindful of our consumption habits. Utilizing incentive programs not only educates New Yorkers about the importance of recycling, but also supports small businesses by injecting money back into the local economy and saving our City millions each year. This new program will go a long way in making recycling more accessible and commonplace – an important step in the right direction for both our environment and our pocketbooks," said Public Advocate Letitia James.

Intro. 1198-A requires DEP to publish a plan for reducing flooding in Queens Community Districts 12 and 13, and to report annually on progress.

"For decades, residents of Southeast Queens have lived with the fact that a slight rain could end in their home being flooded. Thankfully, the de Blasio administration answered the call and came up with a real solution with a 10-year plan and a $1.5 billion commitment. This bill will ensure that the plan is implemented in a timely fashion and the community can be updated on the progress on a regular basis. I'd like to thank Mayor de Blasio, former DEP Commissioner Emily Lloyd, Acting DEP Commissioner Vincent Sapienza, Speaker Mark-Viverito and Council Members Miller, Constantinides, and Ulrich for all of their work and support in making this bill come to fruition," said Council Member Donovan Richards.

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