NYC Sandy Funding Tracker
Progress on Housing Recovery

Progress in the Build it Back program has ramped up following a major program overhaul. The de Blasio Administration’s report “One City, Rebuilding Together” details changes made to accelerate assistance to homeowners, setting a goal to start construction on 500 homes and issue 500 reimbursement checks by the end of the summer.

Before construction starts, Build it Back assesses homeowner’s storm damages to determine eligibility. Then homeowners finalize their choices among available recovery options.

Progress in Case Management
Time Frame Option Review Meetings Options Selected Design Consultations Completed
As of 12/31/13 451 0 0
As of 8/29/14 5,654 2,919 1,023

Once homeowners finish the case management process, reimbursement checks are issued for eligible out-of-pocket expenses, and construction begins. 

Reimbursement Checks and Construction Status
Time Frame Reimbursement Checks Approved Construction Starts Homes Fully Repaired
As of 12/31/13 0 0 0
As of 8/29/14 543 535 68
Program changes to streamline assistance
To streamline relief for businesses impacted by Hurricane Sandy, Mayor de Blasio announced a series of changes to the Hurricane Sandy Loan and Grant Program:
If you are a small business that experienced direct damage as a result of the storm, you can now access up to $100,000 in grant money. Eligible applicants who demonstrate the ability to repay a loan with unmet need greater than $100,000 may qualify for a grant and loan up to $1.1 million. In cases of severe need, these applicants may receive all grant awards. Applicants with unmet need greater than $1.1 million will receive matching loans and grants. Loans will have a 1% interest rate and must be repaid in five years. Program restrictions still apply; businesses must still demonstrate an unmet need, and damage from the storm.
In addition to the program changes, extra resources will be dedicated in order to speed up the application process and provide technical assistance.
Help for Impacted Businesses
Time Frame Completed Applications Submitted to Lender Loans and Grants Approved Value of Approved Loans and Grants
As of 12/31/13 75 3 $1.5 million
As of 7/21/14 182 30 $4.2 million
Additional links
Securing Recovery Assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)

The FEMA Public Assistance program funds storm recovery work by the City, including emergency response, repairs to damaged infrastructure, and resiliency upgrades to protect against future storms. FEMA and the City are working to execute grant agreements that cover all eligible costs of Sandy recovery.

Overview and Key Recent Accomplishments

Public Assistance Grants by Project Type
Project Type Approved Grants In Development Grants Total1
Rapid Repairs (Emergency Repairs for Private Residences) $411,955,460 $190,000,000 $601,955,460
School Reconstruction $7,030,696 $463,131,161 $470,161,857
Beach Renovation $468,231,995 $96,787,246 $565,019,241
City Labor $356,496,303 $17,910,741 $374,407,043
Hospital Recovery $154,735,213 $970,860,533 $1,125,595,746
All Other Types $798,677,877 $611,604,062 $1,410,281,939
Total $2,197,127,543 $2,350,293,743 $4,547,421,286
1. Total does not include over $600 million in potential FEMA Public Assistance grants for NYCHA Housing Reconstruction or over $300 million estimated in other federal funding programs, such as the Federal Highway Administration’s and the Federal Transit Administration’s Emergency Relief programs. 

Accomplishments to date in 2014

In the first half of 2014, the City has reached important agreements with FEMA worth $1 billion in funding for critical repairs and resiliency upgrades for damaged infrastructure.

Rockaway Beach and Boardwalk will be replaced and strengthened. The City will receive $462 million to replace the Rockaway Beach and Boardwalk between Beach 9th Street and Beach 126th Street in Queens. This will include $199 million for mitigation measures to help the boardwalk better withstand future disasters, including elevating the boardwalk 3 feet above base flood levels of 13 to 17 feet.

Bellevue Hospital will be repaired. $131 million will fund repairs of Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan. Electric, mechanical, and heating-cooling systems in the basement that were destroyed by massive flooding will be replaced, and architectural damage from high winds and driving rain will be fixed. Additional mitigation measures to prevent future damage are under development.

Over 500,000 feet of electrical conduit will be replaced. $158 million1 will fund conduit replacement for FDNY fire control boxes, $40 million will fund conduit replacement for DOT street lighting and traffic controls, and over $60 million will fund conduit replacement at DOC, NYPD, DSNY, and DPR facilities, DEP water treatment facilities, and the New York Aquarium. Given the breadth of damage caused by Sandy, replacement will be quicker and more cost effective than the standard FEMA methodology of inspecting each segment to explore the feasibility of cleaning and repair.

Over 200 specialized vehicles will be replaced. The standard FEMA-PA methodology reimburses governments for the used “blue book” value of damaged vehicles. However, specialized vehicles such as fire trucks, police patrol cars, and sanitation trucks must be custom-built to meet the unique needs of NYC. This agreement between FEMA and the City provides additional funding to cover the full replacement cost of vehicles damaged by Sandy. Through Q2 2014, $45 million in grants have been approved for damaged vehicles.

Grant awards for recovery work. $938 million in agreements for new funding were approved by the City in Q1 2014 and Q2 2014, including $5 million for a temporary health clinic to serve Coney Island residents. 181 separate agreements were made, including 54 agreements representing over $1 million each.

The three agencies with the most new funding were:
  • Department of Parks and Recreation: $487 million in new funding, including $462 million described above for Rockaway Beach and Boardwark, as well as $5.2 million for sports areas in the Rockaways and $4 million for Ferry Point Soccer Field in the Bronx.
  • Health and Hospitals Corporation: $158 million in new funding, including $131 million for Bellevue Hospital describe above, as well as $6.1 million for building repairs, $6 million for equipment replacement, and $1.6 million for mitigation measures, all at Metropolitan Hospital Center in Manhattan.
  • Department of Transportation: $65.2 million in new funding, including $23.3 million for street reconstruction, $13.7 million for building damages, and $8.7 million for road resurfacing.

$129 million in reimbursements for completed recovery work were secured in Q1 2014 and Q2 2014. The largest reimbursement payment in this period was $67 million for costs related to the Rapid Repairs program which made emergency repairs to damaged homes. Of the 81 separate payments received by the City in this period, 47 were for the Department of Education and the School Construction Authority, primarily for repairs to damaged schools.

Additional Links
1. The FEMA Public Assistance grants formalizing funding for conduit replacement are currently being developed. As a result, the $938 million of new grant awards reported on this page does not include the additional funding for conduit replacement, estimated at over $258 million.
Funding Overview

Congress allocated over $50 billion to fund recovery efforts for Hurricane Sandy, the second costliest storm in U.S. history. To date, $13 billion of this funding is anticipated to benefit recovery in New York City.

Some funding is provided to and administered by the New York City government, while other funding is directly administered by federal agencies. Click here for a full overview of funding sources.

$13 Billion in Federal Funding for Sandy Recovery in NYC
Administered by The New York City $10.6 billion
Administered by Federal Agencies $2.4 billion
Total $13 billion

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recovery Maps
Recovery activities are underway throughout the five boroughs. Use the links below to find out what is happening in your area.
Other Useful Maps
›› US Geological Survey’s Hurricane Sandy Storm Tide Map - Search by address or zip code near the upper-right corner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Congress allocated over $50 billion to fund recovery efforts for Hurricane Sandy, the second costliest storm in U.S. history. To date, approximately $13 billion of this funding has been earmarked for projects in New York City. Some federally funded programs are administered by City agencies, while in other cases programs are administered directly by federal agencies.

Federal Recovery Funding for New York City
U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) - Community Development Block Grant - Disaster Recovery (CDBG-DR)
Funds AllocatedAmount of funding identified by HUD as available to cover certain recovery activities, once the City has described these activities in its approved CDBG-DR Action Plan.
Funds ObligatedThe amount of funding for recovery activities described in the City's CDBG-DR Action plan, that have then been approved in grant agreements between the City and HUD.
City SpendingThe costs associated with activities described in the CDBG-DR Action Plan that have been performed as a result of Hurricane Sandy.
Federal Funds ReceivedThe amount of funding HUD has paid to the City as reimbursement for dollars spent.
BusinessThe City's business recovery programs allow businesses to be able to sustain current employment levels as well as hire new staff. The City is providing funding to sustain, attract, and recruit new businesses and capital to areas most impacted by the storm. In addition, the City is fostering new technologies to encourage both existing and new businesses to deploy mitigation measures to minimize the impact of future disasters and catastrophes.
Housing / Build it BackThe City's housing recovery programs are designed to meet the unmet housing repair or rebuilding needs of residents affected by Hurricane Sandy. Eligible uses of this funding cover homeowners, tenants, and landlords of both private and public rental properties.
Infrastructure and Other City ServicesThe City provided emergency services throughout the impacted communities before, during, and after Hurricane Sandy. Additionally, the severe destruction and flooding brought on by Hurricane Sandy caused significant damage to the infrastructure systems and key public facilities within New York City, such as roads, bridges, drainage systems, public utility infrastructure, schools, hospitals, and parks sites. The City's IOCS program provides funding to enable the City to continue to perform these critical activities.
Where eligible, these CDBG-DR funds cover the local match portion of projects funded with FEMA dollars (90% FEMA / 10% CDBG-DR) as well as additional recovery costs not covered by FEMA.
ResilienceThe City's resiliency programs help vulnerable areas continue to recover from the storm and better withstand climate events in the future. These solutions include measures to protect the City's coastline and its building stock.
Citywide Administration and PlanningCDBG-DR funds may be used for activities designed to plan and manage programs and activities for the grantee's CBDG-DR program. These funds may also be used to pay reasonable program administration costs related to the execution of disaster recovery activities assisted with the CDBG-DR Grant.
Estimated Job CreationAn estimate of the number of jobs that will be created or supported by this funding. The estimate is produced by an established methodology provided by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis: based on the allocated value of funding and the industry category, the appropriate jobs multiplier is used to estimate total employment impact (including both direct and indirect job creation). The jobs multipliers are produced by the Regional Input-Output Modeling System (RIMS II) an economic model which analyzes the overall impact of increased demand for goods and services on local economic activity. The model is based on patterns of industrial and household demand, as well as specific regional characteristics, such as the concentration of specific industries within a region. More information on this methodology is available at http://www.bea.gov/regional/rims/.
For the Hurricane Sandy Business Loan and Grant program, estimated job creation is based on program-specific forecasts and commitments made by assisted businesses.
NYC Build it Back
NYC Build it BackNYC Build it Back program assists the homeowners, landlords, and tenants in the five boroughs whose homes were damaged by Hurricane Sandy. NYC Build It Back provides several pathways to help affected residents return to permanent, sustainable housing by addressing unmet housing recovery needs in several categories.
Program DetailsOn Monday, June 3rd, Mayor Bloomberg announced the opening of registration for the NYC Build it Back program, New York City's program to assist homeowners, landlords, and tenants in the five boroughs whose homes and properties were damaged by Hurricane Sandy. NYC Build It Back provides several pathways to help affected residents return to permanent, sustainable housing by addressing unmet housing recovery needs in several categories. Build it Back Registration closed on October 31, 2013.
Building TypeFor the purposes of the NYC Build it Back program building type is categorized by the number of units.
Multi-Family (5+ Units)Multi-family buildings are those with 5 or more units.
Single-Family (1-4 Units)Single-family buildings are those with 1 to 4 units.
Program MilestoneOnce a homeowner, renter or landlord has registered for NYC Build it Back, the applicant completes an intake appointment and submits required documents with a Housing Recovery Specialist in a Build it Back Center. After document collection and review, an inspector visits the applicant's home to assess existing damage and repair work already completed. Next, Build it Back calculates the total eligible award and presents options to the applicant. Once the applicant selects a path forward, construction may begin. Each of these points represents a NYC Build it Back program milestone.
Active ApplicationsThe total number of active homeowner or landlord applications with NYC Build it Back.
Document Collection and Review CompletedThe total number of applicants who have completed an intake appointment and submitted the required documents with a Housing Recovery Specialist in a Build It Back Center.
Damage Inspections CompletedThe number of applicants for whom a Build It Back inspector has assessed damage and repair work already completed.
Award Calculation CompletedThe number of applicants for whom the Build it Back program has calculated the total eligible award amount.
Award SelectedThe number of applicants that have selected a construction path.
Contractors SelectedNumber of applications that have a NYC Build It Back contractor selected.
Construction StartedThe number of applicants whose home is under construction.
Construction CompletedThe number of applicants with construction completed.
Reimbursement Checks Sent OutThe number of Single-Family program applicants who have been sent a reimbursement check for Hurricane Sandy-related rehabilitation work completed with personal funds.
LMILow-to-Moderate Income.
Estimated Job CreationAn estimate of the number of jobs that will be created or supported by this funding. The estimate is produced by an established methodology provided by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis: based on the allocated value of funding and the industry category, the appropriate jobs multiplier is used to estimate total employment impact (including both direct and indirect job creation). The jobs multipliers are produced by the Regional Input-Output Modeling System (RIMS II) an economic model which analyzes the overall impact of increased demand for goods and services on local economic activity. The model is based on patterns of industrial and household demand, as well as specific regional characteristics, such as the concentration of specific industries within a region. More information on this methodology is available at http://www.bea.gov/regional/rims/.
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) - Public Assistance (PA)
FEMA Public Assistance ProgramA program which provides supplemental Federal disaster grant assistance for debris removal, emergency protective measures, and the repair, replacement, or restoration of disaster-damaged, publicly owned facilities and the facilities of certain Private Non-Profit (PNP) organizations.
Cost EstimateOverall cost estimates for storm preparation, response and recovery. These estimates include resiliency upgrades associated with recovery projects. Please note that these numbers represent expenditures by City agencies, not overall storm costs.
Grants AwardedThe current total of the Project Worksheet (PWs) costs to date. PWs are submitted to FEMA for every project for which the City is seeking reimbursement.
City SpendingThe cumulative amount of all funding spent on Sandy-related needs, both capital and operating. The expenditure amounts include personnel costs and direct costs other than personnel.
Federal Funds ReceivedThe total amount that FEMA has dispersed for an eligible project.
Buildings and Other HousingFunding related to the Department of Buildings, Housing and Preservation Development, and the NYC Rapid Repairs program.

The NYC Rapid Repairs program helped residential property owners affected by Hurricane Sandy make emergency repairs. These emergency repairs allowed residents to stay in their homes and complete more permanent repairs and finishes. Emergency repairs included permanent or temporary restoration of heat, power and hot water, and other limited repairs to protect a home from further significant damage.
HospitalsFunding activity related to the Health and Hospitals Corporation.
Uniformed AgenciesFunding activity related to the Police Department, Fire Department, Department of Corrections, and the Department of Sanitation.
NYCHAFunding activity related to the New York City Housing Authority.
ParksFunding activity related to the Department of Parks and Recreation.
Roads and BridgesFunding activity related to the Department of Transportation.
SchoolsFunding activity related to the Department of Education and the School Construction Authority.
Other AgenciesFunding activity related to various other City entities.
Estimated Job CreationAn estimate of the number of jobs that will be created or supported by this funding. The estimate is produced by an established methodology provided by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis: based on the allocated value of funding and the industry category, the appropriate jobs multiplier is used to estimate total employment impact (including both direct and indirect job creation). The jobs multipliers are produced by the Regional Input-Output Modeling System (RIMS II) an economic model which analyzes the overall impact of increased demand for goods and services on local economic activity. The model is based on patterns of industrial and household demand, as well as specific regional characteristics, such as the concentration of specific industries within a region. More information on this methodology is available at http://www.bea.gov/regional/rims/.
U.S Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) - Emergency Relief (ER)
FHWA Emergency Relief ProgramA program which funds the repair or reconstruction of Federal-aid highways and roads which have suffered serious damage as a result of natural disasters.
Cost EstimateCost estimates for storm preparation, response, and recovery for activities reimbursable by the FHWA-ER program. These estimates include resiliency upgrades associated with recovery projects.
GrantedThe current total of approved FHWA-ER grants to date. Grants are submitted to FHWA for every project for which the New York City Department of Transportation is seeking reimbursement.
City SpendingThe amount of funding spent by the New York City Department of Transportation on Sandy-related activities reimbursable by the FHWA-ER program, both capital and operating. The expenditure amounts include personnel costs and direct costs other than personnel.
Federal Funds ReceivedThe total amount that FHWA has dispersed for an eligible project.
U.S Federal Transit Administration (FTA) - Emergency Relief (ER)
FTA Emergency Relief ProgramA program which funds the protection, repair, and/or replacement public transportation systems, equipment, and facilities suffering serious damage as a result of an emergency.
Cost EstimateCost estimates for storm preparation, response, and recovery for activities reimbursable by the FTA-ER program. These estimates include resiliency upgrades associated with recovery projects.
GrantedThe current total of approved FTA-ER grants to date. Grants are submitted to FTA for every project for which the City is seeking reimbursement.
City SpendingThe amount of funding spent by the City on Sandy-related activities reimbursable by the FTA-ER program, both capital and operating. The expenditure amounts include personnel costs and direct costs other than personnel.
Federal Funds ReceivedThe total amount that FTA has dispersed for an eligible project.
U.S Department of Labor (DOL) - National Emergency Grants (NEG)
DOL National Emergency Grant ProgramA program which provides grants to create temporary employment opportunities in the aftermath of disasters to assist with clean-up and humanitarian assistance.
City SpendingThe amount of funding spent by the City on Sandy-related activities reimbursable by the NEG program, both capital and operating. The expenditure amounts include only personnel costs.
Jobs CreatedThe number of jobs created as a result of this funding.
Contracts
Total SpendingThe total value of Sandy-related work anticipated to be performed under a specific contract. In cases where the contract will also cover non-Sandy work, the total value of the contract may be higher than the value of Sandy-related work reported on this site.
Total Contract SpendingThe value of payments made to the contractor for Sandy-related work.
Contract Spending as Percentage of TotalThe percentage of total City spending expended through contracts.
Estimated Job CreationAn estimate of the number of jobs that will be created or supported by this funding. The estimate is produced by an established methodology provided by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis: based on the allocated value of funding and the industry category, the appropriate jobs multiplier is used to estimate total employment impact (including both direct and indirect job creation). The jobs multipliers are produced by the Regional Input-Output Modeling System (RIMS II) an economic model which analyzes the overall impact of increased demand for goods and services on local economic activity. The model is based on patterns of industrial and household demand, as well as specific regional characteristics, such as the concentration of specific industries within a region. More information on this methodology is available at http://www.bea.gov/regional/rims/.
Start and End DatesThe start and end dates of the contract. In cases where the contract will also cover non-Sandy work, these dates may be different than the start and end dates of the Sandy-related portion of the work.
Procurement Methods
The City uses a variety of procurement methods to achieve the best value for the taxpayers' dollar, with high quality goods and services and timely delivery at fair and reasonable prices. For more information on procurement, visit the homepage of the Mayor's Office of Contract Services at http://www.nyc.gov/mocs.
AssignmentAn agreement to transfer from one vendor to another the right to receive payment and the responsibility to perform fully under the terms of the contract.
Commodity RequestAn order of goods or services, often against a pre-existing contract solicited by one of the methods described here.
Competitive Sealed BiddingCompetitive sealed bids are publicly solicited and awarded to the responsive and responsible vendor that agrees to provide the goods or services at the lowest price.
Competitive Bid from Prequalified ListCompetitive sealed bids that are solicited from vendors previously selected as having the appropriate qualifications. The opportunity to apply for inclusion in a prequalified list is made open to all vendors.
Delivery OrderAn order of goods or services, often against a pre-existing contract solicited by one of the methods described here.
EmergencyEmergency procurements are used to obtain goods and services quickly, when an agency must address threats to public health or safety, or provide necessary service on an emergency basis. In many cases there is limited competition in order to ensure rapid delivery of goods or services.
Intergovernmental ProcurementA fast-track method that enables City agencies to buy goods or services using pre-existing contracts between vendors and other government agencies, typically New York State.
Intergovernmental Procurement RenewalA renewal of an intergovernmental procurement.
Lessee NegotiationNegotiation for leasing property.
Miscellaneous RequestAn order of goods or services, often against a pre-existing contract solicited by one of the methods described here.
Multiple AwardsA contract registered under a Master Agreement between the City and a vendor. Often multiple contract awards are made from the same Master Agreement based on the City's needs. The original Master Agreement is typically solicited through one of the other methods described here.
Negotiated AcquisitionNegotiated acquisitions are used when only a few vendors are available to provide the goods or services needed, when there is limited time available to procure necessary goods or services, or when a competitive procurement is otherwise not feasible. When appropriate, solicitations for negotiated acquisitions are publicly advertised.
Negotiated Acquisition ExtensionNegotiated acquisition extensions are used when necessary to ensure that services may continue uninterrupted while an agency is in the process of conducting a new Request for Proposals for those services. This method is also used when additional time and/or money are needed to complete a construction project.
Non-Commodity RequestAn order of goods or services, often against a pre-existing contract solicited by one of the methods described here.
Purchase OrderAn order of goods or services, often against a pre-existing contract solicited by one of the methods described here.
Renewal of ContractThis method is used to continue operation of a registered contract beyond the original term. Renewal options are stipulated in the original contract.
Request for Proposal (RFP)This method is used when an agency must consider factors in addition to price, such as experience and expertise. RFPs are publicly solicited.
RFP from a Prequalified ListIn this method, responses to the RFP are solicited from vendors previously selected as having the appropriate qualifications. The opportunity to apply for inclusion in a prequalified list is made open to all vendors.
Sole SourceThis method is used when only one vendor is available to provide the required goods or services.

Ensuring Fair Wages

The City of New York actively monitors its contractors to ensure all local, state & federal wage regulations are followed. This page provides a brief overview of laws and monitoring processes that relate to federally funded contracts for Hurricane Sandy recovery.

Applicable Laws

State Prevailing Wage
New York Labor Law section 220 applies to contracts for public work (e.g., construction or renovation of a public building or public structure) and imposes an obligation to pay prevailing wages to “laborers, workers, and mechanics” employed on a public work project. State prevailing wage requirements do not apply to the construction or renovation of residential property that is privately owned. The New York City Comptroller sets the City’s prevailing wage rates for work covered by Labor Law section 220.

Federal Prevailing Wage
The Davis-Bacon Related Acts (Davis-Bacon) require the payment of prevailing wage for certain federally funded construction work involving an excess of $2,000. Construction work funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Community Development Block Grant - Disaster Recovery (CDBG-DR) program is subject to Davis-Bacon, with a notable exception: Davis-Bacon does not apply to construction work on residential property containing less than eight units. The U.S. Department of Labor sets the City’s prevailing wage rates for work covered by Davis-Bacon.

Some contracts are covered by both the New York Labor Law and Davis-Bacon. For those contracts, if the prevailing wage rate set by the City Comptroller differs from the prevailing wage rate set by the U.S. Department of Labor, the higher wage applies to the work.

Building Services & Other Occupations
For work involving building services or other occupations, contractors may be required to pay prevailing wages under New York Labor Law section 230, or living wages under section 6-109 of the New York City Administrative Code.

Monitoring & Enforcement

Due Diligence by City Agencies
In addition to monitoring existing contracts, contracting agencies review compliance histories and price proposals when awarding contracts. For instance Executive Order 102 of 2007 (EO 102) provides for an enhanced agency review when the price difference between the apparent low bid and the next lowest responsive bid exceeds specified thresholds. This review ensures that the low bid has not been made in disregard of the bidder’s obligation to pay all workers their legally mandated wages.

Oversight by the Mayor’s Office of Contract Services
To supplement monitoring directly by City agencies, the New York City Mayor’s Office of Contract Services (MOCS) provides oversight of contracting activities to ensure compliance with all labor-related laws. MOCS provides formal training each year on labor issues for City agency staff, and additional educational outreach at the request of agencies. For contracts that trigger the enhanced EO 102 review described above, MOCS examines the contracting agency’s determination before an award is made.
Pursuant to authority granted to the City of New York under State Labor Law 816-b, MOCS also oversees compliance with the requirement that certain construction and construction-related maintenance contractors maintain apprenticeship agreements with programs registered with, and approved by, the New York State Department of Labor. The apprenticeship program directive, issued by MOCS on January 18, 2007, applies to individual construction contracts and construction-related maintenance contracts over $3 million that use apprenticeable construction-related trade classifications. Additionally, projects with an overall value of more than $5 million which have individual construction contracts that use apprenticeable construction-related trade classifications over $1 million are covered. If a prime contract is subject to the apprenticeship requirements, any subcontracts over $1 million are also covered by the program.
In addition to the summary provided here, more information is available at the MOCS website.
Enforcement by the New York City Comptroller
In addition to setting applicable wage rates, the Comptroller’s Bureau of Labor Law enforces wage rules to make sure that workers are paid the wages they are legally entitled to.
The Bureau investigates potential violations by City contractors and brings legal proceedings where warranted. Remedies for violations include withholding contract funds and backpayments to underpaid employees, with interest.
More information on the Comptroller’s role in setting and enforcing wage levels is available at https://comptroller.nyc.gov/general-information/prevailing-wage/. Workers that believe they have been underpaid can use this website to file a complaint, or search past cases to see if the Comptroller has already recouped money to which they are entitled.