NYC Sandy Funding Tracker

New Yorkers can use the Sandy Funding Tracker to track the City's use of federal disaster recovery and resilience funds provided through the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act, 2013 (Public Law 113-2), and Sandy Recovery Improvement Act of 2013 (SRIA). The Sandy Funding Tracker provides a Funding Summary, which gives an overview of all disaster recovery and resilience dollars allocated to date by funding type and funding details. The Sandy Funding Tracker also provides further detailed information about projects and programs in each major category of disaster relief funds.

  • U.S DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (HUD) - Community Development Block Grant-Disaster Recovery (CDBG-DR)

On March 5, 2013, the City received a $1.77 billion grant allocation for eligible Hurricane Sandy disaster recovery and rebuilding activities through the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act, 2013 (Public Law 113-2), signed into law by President Obama on January 29, 2013. The City received a second allocation of $1.447 billion on November 18, 2013. The funding helps New Yorkers rebuild their homes, businesses, and communities through City-led housing, business, infrastructure, and resiliency programs. The City’s Action Plan to use the first tranche of funds was approved by HUD on May 7, 2013, and the City is currently in the process of amending the Action Plan to describe the second tranche of funding.

  • FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY (FEMA) - Public Assistance (PA)

Through the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act, 2013 (Public Law 113-2) and the Sandy Recovery Improvement Act of 2013 (SRIA), FEMA has provided Public Assistance funds to the City to reimburse eligible costs of emergency response, debris removal and repairing or rebuilding damaged public facilities. FEMA and the City continue to work together to finalize funding for eligible costs as part of the longer term recovery.

General
CDBG-DR FundingCommunity Development Block Grant-Distater Recovery (CDBG-DR) funding is a grant distributed by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to the City of New York for specific Sandy disaster recovery and rebuilding activities, including housing, business, infrastructure, and resiliency.
Details on City grant-funded programs and uses can be found at http://www.nyc.gov/html/recovery/html/reports/bg-dr.shtml
FEMA-PA FundingThe Public Assistance (PA) Grant Program is administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and provides funds to the City of New York for the reimbursement of costs incurred by the City on Sandy disaster activities, including debris removal; emergency protective measures; and the repair, replacement, or restoration of Sandy-damaged publicly owned facilities. PA funds cover at least 75% of eligible costs from Sandy emergency measures and permanent restoration.
AllocatedThe amount of federal dollars assigned to the City to be spent on a specific set of activities or uses.
ObligatedThe cost of projects that FEMA has determined to be eligible for Public Assistance funding.
SpentThe total dollars paid out by the City for specific activities as a result of Hurricane Sandy. This includes all Sandy-related costs, including capital and operating expenses.
Note: Spending can be greater than the amount obligated for PA.
Funds FinalizedThe amount of federal money that has been dispersed to and used by the City on Sandy-related activities.
U.S DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (HUD) - Community Development Block Grant-Disaster Recovery (CDBG-DR)
AllocatedAmount of funding identified by HUD as available to cover certain recovery activities, once the City has described these activities in its Action Plan.
SpentThe costs associated with activities performed as a result of Hurricane Sandy.
Funds FinalizedThe amount of funding HUD has paid to the City as reimbursement for dollars spent.
Housing / Build it BackThe City's housing recovery programs are designed to meet the unmet housing repair or rebuilding needs of residents affected by Hurricane Sandy. Eligible uses of this funding cover homeowners, tenants, and landlords of both private and public rental properties.
Business RecoveryThe City's business recovery programs allow businesses to be able to sustain current employment levels as well as hire new staff. The City is providing funding to sustain, attract, and recruit new businesses and capital to areas most impacted by the storm. In addition, the City is fostering new technologies to encourage both existing and new businesses to deploy mitigation measures to minimize the impact of future disasters and catastrophes.
ResiliencyThe City's resiliency programs help vulnerable areas continue to recover from the storm and better withstand climate events in the future. These solutions include measures to protect the City's coastline and its building stock.
Infrastructure and Other City ServicesThe City provided emergency services throughout the impacted communities before, during, and after Hurricane Sandy. Additionally, the severe destruction and flooding brought on by Hurricane Sandy caused significant damage to the infrastructure systems and key public facilities within New York City, such as roads, bridges, drainage systems, public utility infrastructure, schools, hospitals, and parks sites. The City’s IOCS program provides funding to enable the City to continue to perform these critical activities.
Where eligible, these CDBG-DR funds cover the local match portion of projects funded with FEMA dollars (90% FEMA/10% CDBG-DR) as well as additional recovery costs not covered by FEMA.
Citywide Administration and PlanningCDBG-DR funds may be used for activities designed to plan and manage programs and activities for the grantee's CBDG-DR program. These funds may also be used to pay reasonable program administration costs related to the execution of disaster recovery activities assisted with the CDBG-DR Grant.
NYC Build it BackNYC Build it Back program assists the homeowners, landlords, and tenants in the five boroughs whose homes were damaged by Hurricane Sandy. NYC Build It Back provides several pathways to help affected residents return to permanent, sustainable housing by addressing unmet housing recovery needs in several categories.
Program DetailsOn Monday, June 3rd, Mayor Bloomberg announced the opening of registration for the NYC Build it Back program, New York City’s program to assist homeowners, landlords, and tenants in the five boroughs whose homes and properties were damaged by Hurricane Sandy. NYC Build It Back provides several pathways to help affected residents return to permanent, sustainable housing by addressing unmet housing recovery needs in several categories. Build it Back Registration closed on October 31, 2013.
Building TypeFor the purposes of the NYC Build it Back program building type is categorized by the number of units.
Multi-Family (5+ Units)Multi-family buildings are those with 5 or more units.
Single-Family (1-4 Units)Single-family buildings are those with 1 to 4 units.
Program MilestoneOnce a homeowner, renter or landlord has registered for NYC Build it Back, the applicant completes an intake appointment and submits required documents with a Housing Recovery Specialist in a Build it Back Center. After document collection and review, an inspector visits the applicant’s home to assess existing damage and repair work already completed. Next, Build it Back calculates the total eligible award and presents options to the applicant. Once the applicant selects a path forward, construction may begin. Each of these points represents a NYC Build it Back program milestone.
RegistrationsThe total number of homeowners or landlords that have registered for NYC Build it Back.
Document Collection and Review CompletedThe total number of applicants who have completed an intake appointment and submitted the required documents with a Housing Recovery Specialist in a Build It Back Center.
Damage Inspections CompletedThe number of applicants for whom a Build It Back inspector has assessed damage and repair work already completed.
Award Calculation CompletedThe number of applicants for whom the Build it Back program has calculated the total eligible award amount.
Award SelectedThe number of applicants that have selected a construction path.
Contractors SelectedNumber of applications that have a NYC Build It Back contractor selected.
Construction in ProgressThe number of applicants whose home is under construction.
Construction CompletedThe number of applicants with construction completed.
LMILow-to-Moderate Income.
Estimated Jobs CreatedAn estimate of the number of jobs that will be created or supported by this funding. The estimate is produced by an established methodology provided by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis: based on the allocated value of funding and the industry category, the appropriate jobs multiplier is used to estimate total employment impact (including both direct and indirect job creation). The jobs multipliers are produced by the Regional Input-Output Modeling System (RIMS II) an economic model which analyzes the overall impact of increased demand for goods and services on local economic activity. The model is based on patterns of industrial and household demand, as well as specific regional characteristics, such as the concentration of specific industries within a region. More information on this methodology is available at http://www.bea.gov/regional/rims/.
FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY (FEMA) - Public Assistance (PA)
FEMA Public Assistance ProgramA program which provides supplemental Federal disaster grant assistance for debris removal, emergency protective measures, and the repair, replacement, or restoration of disaster-damaged, publicly owned facilities and the facilities of certain Private Non-Profit (PNP) organizations.
ObligatedThe cost of projects that FEMA has determined to be eligible for Public Assistance funding.
SpentThe cumulative amount of all funding spent on Sandy-related needs, both capital and operating. The expenditure amounts include personnel costs and direct costs other than personnel.
Funds FinalizedThe total amount that FEMA has dispersed for an eligible project.
GrantedThe current total of the Project Worksheet (PWs) costs to date. PWs are submitted to FEMA for every project for which the City is seeking reimbursement.
Cost TrackerOverall cost estimates for storm preparation, response and recovery. These estimates include resiliency upgrades associated with recovery projects. Please note that these numbers represent expenditures by City agencies, not overall storm costs.
Buildings and Other HousingFunding related to the Department of Buildings, Housing and Preservation Development, and the NYC Rapid Repairs program.

The NYC Rapid Repairs program helped residential property owners affected by Hurricane Sandy make emergency repairs. These emergency repairs allowed residents to stay in their homes and complete more permanent repairs and finishes. Emergency repairs included permanent or temporary restoration of heat, power and hot water, and other limited repairs to protect a home from further significant damage.
Uniformed AgenciesFunding activity related to the Police Department, Fire Department, Department of Corrections, and the Department of Sanitation.
SchoolsFunding activity related to the Department of Education and the School Construction Authority.
Roads and BridgesFunding activity related to the Department of Transportation.
ParksFunding activity related to the Department of Parks and Recreation.
Other AgenciesFunding activity related to various other City entities.
HospitalsFunding activity related to the Health and Hospitals Corporation.
NYCHAFEMA Funding activity related to the New York City Housing Authority.
Estimated Jobs CreatedAn estimate of the number of jobs that will be created or supported by this funding. The estimate is produced by an established methodology provided by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis: based on the allocated value of funding and the industry category, the appropriate jobs multiplier is used to estimate total employment impact (including both direct and indirect job creation). The jobs multipliers are produced by the Regional Input-Output Modeling System (RIMS II) an economic model which analyzes the overall impact of increased demand for goods and services on local economic activity. The model is based on patterns of industrial and household demand, as well as specific regional characteristics, such as the concentration of specific industries within a region. More information on this methodology is available at http://www.bea.gov/regional/rims/.
Contract Information
ValueThe total value of Sandy-related work anticipated to be performed under a specific contract. In cases where the contract will also cover non-Sandy work, the total value of the contract may be higher than the value of Sandy-related work reported on this site.
Amount ExpendedThe value of payments made to the contractor for Sandy-related work.
Estimated Jobs CreatedAn estimate of the number of jobs that will be created or supported by this funding. The estimate is produced by an established methodology provided by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis: based on the allocated value of funding and the industry category, the appropriate jobs multiplier is used to estimate total employment impact (including both direct and indirect job creation). The jobs multipliers are produced by the Regional Input-Output Modeling System (RIMS II) an economic model which analyzes the overall impact of increased demand for goods and services on local economic activity. The model is based on patterns of industrial and household demand, as well as specific regional characteristics, such as the concentration of specific industries within a region. More information on this methodology is available at http://www.bea.gov/regional/rims/.
Start & End DatesThe start & end dates of the contract. In cases where the contract will also cover non-Sandy work, these dates may be different than the start & end dates of the Sandy-related portion of the work.
Procurement Methods
The City uses a variety of procurement methods to achieve the best value for the taxpayers’ dollar, with high quality goods and services and timely delivery at fair and reasonable prices. For more information on procurement, visit the homepage of the Mayor's Office of Contract Services at http://www.nyc.gov/mocs.
AssignmentAn agreement to transfer from one vendor to another the right to receive payment and the responsibility to perform fully under the terms of the contract.
Commodity RequestAn order of goods or services, often against a pre-existing contract solicited by one of the methods described here.
Competitive Sealed BiddingCompetitive sealed bids are publicly solicited and awarded to the responsive and responsible vendor that agrees to provide the goods or services at the lowest price.
Competitive Bid from Prequalified ListCompetitive sealed bids that are solicited from vendors previously selected as having the appropriate qualifications. The opportunity to apply for inclusion in a prequalified list is made open to all vendors.
Delivery OrderAn order of goods or services, often against a pre-existing contract solicited by one of the methods described here.
EmergencyEmergency procurements are used to obtain goods and services quickly, when an agency must address threats to public health or safety, or provide necessary service on an emergency basis. In many cases there is limited competition in order to ensure rapid delivery of goods or services.
Intergovernmental ProcurementA fast-track method that enables City agencies to buy goods or services using pre-existing contracts between vendors and other government agencies, typically New York State.
Intergovernmental Procurement RenewalA renewal of an intergovernmental procurement.
Lessee NegotiationNegotiation for leasing property.
Miscellaneous RequestAn order of goods or services, often against a pre-existing contract solicited by one of the methods described here.
Multiple AwardsA contract registered under a Master Agreement between the City and a vendor. Often multiple contract awards are made from the same Master Agreement based on the City's needs. The original Master Agreement is typically solicited through one of the other methods described here.
Negotiated AcquisitionNegotiated acquisitions are used when only a few vendors are available to provide the goods or services needed, when there is limited time available to procure necessary goods or services, or when a competitive procurement is otherwise not feasible. When appropriate, solicitations for negotiated acquisitions are publicly advertised.
Negotiated Acquisition ExtensionNegotiated acquisition extensions are used when necessary to ensure that services may continue uninterrupted while an agency is in the process of conducting a new Request for Proposals for those services. This method is also used when additional time and/or money are needed to complete a construction project.
Non-Commodity RequestAn order of goods or services, often against a pre-existing contract solicited by one of the methods described here.
Purchase OrderAn order of goods or services, often against a pre-existing contract solicited by one of the methods described here.
Renewal of ContractThis method is used to continue operation of a registered contract beyond the original term. Renewal options are stipulated in the original contract.
Request for Proposal (RFP)This method is used when an agency must consider factors in addition to price, such as experience and expertise. RFPs are publicly solicited.
RFP from a Prequalified ListIn this method, responses to the RFP are solicited from vendors previously selected as having the appropriate qualifications. The opportunity to apply for inclusion in a prequalified list is made open to all vendors.
Sole SourceThis method is used when only one vendor is available to provide the required goods or services.