Board of Correction Reports

Enhanced Supervision Housing (ESH) Assessment and ESH for Young Adults Assesment

In October 2014, as the Board debated historic punitive segregation reforms, the Department proposed a new restrictive housing unit, Enhanced Supervision Housing, that it believed to be a critical part of its punitive segregation and violence reduction plans. The Board ultimately approved a modified version of the proposal. BOC staff published an April 2017 report studying the first twenty-two months of adult ESH placement (February 2015 - November 2016) and is intended to inform the Board's discussion of the effectiveness of ESH. In July 2017, BOC staff published a second report studying ESH for Young Adults, reviewing all young adult placements between September 2016 and March 2017.

A Study of the Department of Correction Inmate Grievance and Request Program

To further objectives related to its City Charter responsibilities, its history of work in this area, and as part of its responsibility to monitor jail conditions, the Board undertook an assessment of the inmate grievance program operated by the Department. The Board sought to understand the current patterns and trends in filing and responding to grievances and the effectiveness, consistency and timeliness of the current system.
                  - Department of Correction Letter Regarding Board's Study

Adolescent and Young Adults in NYC Jails: Key Performance Indicators

This quarterly report creates a series of metrics to measure and evaluate compliance with the City's Minimum Standards for confinement and to track other conditions and policies that impact change toward safer and more humane jails for adolescents and young adults. 

Punitive Segregation Reforms and Exceptions: Recent Results

This quarterly report  is the Board's findings concerning the impact of recent Minimum Standards amendments on the use of punitive segregation in the City's jails and an analysis of the overrides and 7-day waivers aprproved by the Chief of Department.

Visit Restriction Monthly Review

This monthly report analyzes DOC visit restrictions and BOC visit appeals.


Other Reports:

2015

  • Follow-up report on Enhanced Supervision Housing as of April 30, 2015 This is the second report on Enhanced Supervision Housing (ESH). It provides updated demographic information on the ESH inmates, unit operations, and unusual incidents. It then analyzes ESH's mission and some ongoing challenges.
  • Report on the status of punitive segregation reform This report serves as an update on the Department of Correction's (DOC) implementation of the amendments to punitive segregation (PS). It includes a description of the three types of punitive segregation units and information on punitive segregation admissions and transfers. Finally, it presents a discussion of problems with punitive segregation and concluding remarks.
  • Violence in New York City Jails: Slashing and Stabbing Incidents An analysis of the Department of Correction's data on stabbing and slashing incidents and weapons. The report notes that the vast majority of all weapons recovered by DOC staff are jail-made weapons fashioned from materials found inside the jails.
  • Preliminary Report on the Enhanced Supervision Housing Unit This report serves as a first-look at the Department of Correction's (DOC) implementation of Enhanced Supervision Housing (ESH). We summarize the background of ESH and provide a timeline. We then present details on the inmates currently housed in ESH, as well as how the new unit has been operating.
  • Violence Indicators Report Report of violence indicators, March 17, 2015.
  • Comparison of Historical Rates of Violence This report compares of historical rates of violence between inmates and rates of staff use of force on inmates.

2014

2013

  • Three Adolescents with Mental Illness in Punitive Segregation at Rikers Island This report describes the life and jail experience of three mentally ill adolescents who were each sentenced to more than 200 days in punitive segregation at Rikers Island. Mentally ill adolescents in punitive segregation merit special attention because they are among the most vulnerable prisoners in custody.