FAQ

What is the difference between the EEPC and the EEOC?

EEOC stands for Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, which is a federal agency charged with enforcing Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The EEPC is the Equal Employment Practices Commission, which is a City agency authorized to monitor and audit the Equal Employment Opportunity Programs of New York City government agencies and make recommendations to improve their programs.

If I am a City employee, can I file a discrimination complaint with the EEPC?

No. The EEPC is not authorized to investigate individual complaints of employment discrimination. The EEPC is responsible for monitoring the Equal Employment programs, practices, policies, and procedures of all New York City agencies.

Where can I file a complaint of discrimination?

If you are a City employee, you can file a complaint of discrimination with your agency's EEO Officer, whom you can find (for Mayoral agencies) here. If you are a City employee or a private sector employee, you can also file a complaint with one of the following agencies: the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the US Department of Justice, the New York State Division of Human Rights, or the New York City Commission on Human Rights.

Can an employee from the private sector go to the EEPC for help?

No. The EEPC only has authority to monitor the Equal Employment Opportunity Programs of New York City government agencies. As a private sector employee, you can seek assistance from any of the agencies mentioned above.

Is The EEPC a Mayoral agency?

No. The EEPC is not a Mayoral agency. The EEPC has four Commissioners. Two are appointed by the Mayor and two are appointed by the City Council. The Chairperson is appointed by the Mayor and the City Council Speaker.

Can the EEPC audit non-Mayoral agencies, including elected officials?

Yes. The New York City Charter clearly gives the EEPC authority to audit and monitor the Equal Employment Opportunity Programs of all City agencies. The Charter defines "city agency" as a city, county, or borough government entity that is funded by the City or has a majority of its board members appointed by the mayor. Based on this definition, the EEPC has authority to audit mayoral agencies, non-mayoral agencies, and elected officials (e.g. the comptroller, borough presidents, district attorneys, etc).

Where can I get a copy of the last EEPC audit of my agency?

You can obtain copies of all audits from the City Hall Library, or you can send the EEPC a written request pursuant to the Freedom of Information Law (FOIL) directly.