What You Need to Know about the Travel Ban

What is the new travel ban? What is its present status?
On September 24, 2017, President Trump issued a new travel ban. The ban applied different travel restrictions on certain people from eight countries: Chad, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Syria, Venezuela, Yemen, and Somalia. The travel ban also calls for extra review of some of these countries' immigrants and visitors who are not banned.

Please note that ongoing litigation is changing how this travel ban may be implemented. It had previously been almost entirely suspended by federal courts. However, on December 4, 2017, the Supreme Court allowed the U.S. government to temporarily enact the new travel ban.

Until now, federal courts had limited the implementation of the new travel ban. Now, the U.S. government may enact its travel ban in full, as it applies to nationals of the eight countries. See below for additional details.

What are the travel ban restrictions for each of the designated countries?

Chad

  • Immigrant Visas: All suspended
  • Non-Immigrant Visas: Non-immigrants permitted except for business (B-1), tourist (B-2), and business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas.
  • Effective Date: December 4, 2017

Iran

  • Immigrant Visas: All suspended
  • Non-Immigrant Visas: All suspended except for student (F and M) and exchange visitor (J) visas. These nonimmigrant visa categories will be “subject to enhanced screening and vetting requirements.” (Presidential Proclamation 9645, Sec. 2 (b)(ii)).
  • Effective Date: December 4, 2017

Libya

  • Immigrant Visas: All suspended
  • Non-Immigrant Visas: Non-immigrants permitted except for business (B-1), tourist (B-2), and business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas.
  • Effective Date: December 4, 2017

North Korea

  • Immigrant Visas: All suspended
  • Non-immigrant Visas: All suspended
  • Effective Date: October 18, 2017

Syria

  • Immigrant Visas: All suspended
  • Non-immigrant Visas: All suspended
  • Effective Date: December 4, 2017

Venezuela

  • Immigrant Visas: May be subject to "additional scrutiny" (Presidential Proclamation 9645, Sec. 2 (f)(ii))
  • Non-immigrant Visas: B-1, B-2, and B-1/B-2 visas for certain government officials and their immediate family members are suspended.
  • Effective Date: October 18, 2017

Somalia

  • Immigrant Visas: All suspended
  • Non-immigrant Visas: Permitted, but "additional scrutiny" may be applied to determine if applicants are "connected to terrorist organizations or otherwise pose a threat to the national security or public safety of the United States." (Presidential Proclamation 9645, Sec. 2 (h)(ii)).
  • Effective Date: December 4, 2017

Yemen

  • Immigrant Visas: All suspended
  • Non-immigrant Visas: Non-immigrants permitted except for business (B-1), tourist (B-2), and business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas.
  • Effective Date: December 4, 2017
What exceptions apply for immigrants and visitors from banned countries?
The following categories of people are exempt from the travel ban:
  • Lawful Permanent Residents (Green Card holders);
  • Dual-nationals traveling on a passport from a country not affected by the partially implemented travel ban;
  • Recipients of case-by-case waivers issued by the federal government;
  • Individuals who were inside the United States as of the effective date of the travel ban (12:01 am EST, October 18, 2017);
  • Individuals who had a valid visa as of the effective date of the travel ban;
  • Individuals who had a valid travel document other than a visa as of the effective date of the travel ban;
  • Anyone admitted to or paroled into the United States on or after the effective date of the travel ban;
  • Anyone traveling on a diplomatic or diplomatic-type visa, North Atlantic Treaty Organization visa, C-2 visa for travel to the United Nations, or G-1, G-2, G-3, or G-4 visa;
  • Anyone who has been granted asylum by the United States;
  • Anyone who has been granted withholding of removal, advance parole, or protection under the Convention Against Torture; or
  • Anyone who has already been admitted to the United States as a refugee.

Additional City Resources

  • Volunteer: Join the Mayor's Office during upcoming town halls and workshops.
  • Inform & Engage: Invite the Mayor's Office of Immigrant Affairs to your community for a "Know Your Rights Forum."
  • Protection from Discrimination: New Yorkers also have the right to be free from unlawful discrimination, retaliation, and harassment in the workplace, housing, and public places. To file a complaint or learn more, call 311 and say "human rights" or call the NYC Commission on Human Rights at (718) 722-3131.

Frequently Asked Questions

What will happen next?
We do not know for sure. The federal government will implement the travel ban in full, but the federal courts have not resolved whether the travel ban is actually legal. If the federal courts decide that the travel ban is not legal, then the federal government will have to stop implementing the ban. Stay tuned for updates in coming weeks.


If you are concerned about how the travel ban may affect you or your family members’ ability to travel, call 311 and say "ActionNYC" for an appointment for free, safe immigration legal help. The ongoing litigation over the travel ban may affect the information on this page.

How can I avoid fraud while I am seeking immigration legal help?
Beware of unlicensed immigration service providers who take advantage of their customers. Get help only from a trusted, licensed attorney or an accredited representative. Only lawyers or those who have gotten permission from the Department of Justice can give legal advice. For questions about this, or to report fraud, call the New York State New Americans Hotline at 1-800-566-7636 between 9am-8pm, on Monday through Friday, or call 311.

What is the current status of refugee admissions?
On October 24, 2017, the Trump Administration issued an executive order that resumed the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program, after it has been suspended by the first two travel bans. However several new limitations apply:

  • Refugees from eleven unspecified countries are subject to an additional 90-day security review, so refugee admissions from these countries are likely to decrease.
  • The admission of family members who are overseas and are "following-to-join" refugees who have been resettled in the United States has been indefinitely suspended.
  • In addition, the President has capped the maximum number of refugees who may be admitted to the United States this fiscal year at 45,000 people, a historically low number.