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Mayor de Blasio Surpasses Open Streets Target, Announces 13 More Miles of Streets to be Opened by Memorial Day Weekend

May 22, 2020

NYC offers most open streets of any American city; exceeds 40-mile target by end of May

Open Streets will be visible on Google Maps

NEW YORK—Mayor Bill de Blasio announced today that New York City will open 13 more miles of streets to pedestrians and cyclists for the Memorial Day weekend starting tomorrow, May 23rd. The new locations bring New York City's total to 43 miles of open streets since the program was first announced in April, surpassing its original target of 40 miles by the end of May.

Google has added the previous 30 miles of Open Streets into Google Maps, allowing drivers using online navigation to steer clear of these streets; today’s new Open Streets will be added to Google Maps in the coming days.

New York City now has more miles of open streets than any other city in America.

“New Yorkers deserve space to safely enjoy the outdoors in their own neighborhoods,” said Mayor Bill de Blasio. “Thanks to hard work from a host of City agencies, we’ve beaten our Open Streets goal for this month – and made our city a national leader in expanding public space as we fight COVID-19.”

“As we reach a pivotal milestone in our Open Streets program, it has been heartening to see the positive responses from communities and New Yorkers across the City as they enjoy these open spaces safely,” said Deputy Mayor Laura Anglin. “We will continue to work with our local partners, elected officials, BIDS, and countless City agencies, to further identify streets and neighborhoods to help New Yorkers get outside while maintaining social distancing.”

"Open streets are making a real difference in the lives of New Yorkers right now, and we need to keep giving more neighborhoods more space to socially distance outside. It's clear we need to continue expanding this program and that we should consider this initiative a key part of reimagining how we use our public streets during and after the crisis. The Council will continue working with the administration to open more streets, particularly in neighborhoods without enough open space and in places that make it easier for people to get around our city,” said City Council Speaker Corey Johnson.

Nearly nine miles of the new Open Streets will be placed in neighborhoods across the city and managed by local precincts; 1.8 miles will be managed by local partners; and another 2.7 miles will be adjacent to parks.

 
Local Partner Management

Partner

Boro

Street

From

To

Mileage

Notes

Red Hook Initiative

BK

9th St

Henry St

Hicks St

0.08

9a-6p Sat

Village Alliance

MN

University Place

13th St

4th St

0.41

8:30a-1:30p Sun

Village Alliance

MN

MacDougal

4th St

8th St

0.15

8:30a-1:30p Sun

Hudson Sq BID

MN

Greenwich St

Canal St

Spring St

0.08

10a-4p all days

Alliance for Downtown NY

MN

Pearl St

State St

Cedar St

0.46

11a-3p all days

Chinatown District 

MN

Doyers St

Pell St

Bowery

0.05

10a-7p all days

Alliance for Kips Bay

MN

2nd Ave Service Rd

33rd St

30th St

0.13

8a-8p all days

Bedford Stuyvesant Gateway BID

BK

Arlington Pl

Macon St

Fulton St

0.07

Thurs 10-2p

Times Square Alliance

MN

Broadway

47th St

53rd St

0.30

8a-8p all days

Times Square Alliance

MN

Broadway

42nd St

41st St

0.05

8a-8p all days

Total mileage

1.78

 

Local Precinct Management

Neighborhood

Boro

Street

From

To

Mileage

Bed-Stuy

BK

Somers St

Rockaway Ave

Fulton St

0.11

Williamsburg

BK

S 9th St

Berry St

Driggs Ave

0.17

Williamsburg

BK

Grand St

Roebling St

Marcy Ave

0.16

Prospect Heights

BK

Underhill Ave

St. Johns Pl

Bergen St

0.32

Prospect Heights

BK

Carlton Ave

Park Pl

Bergen St

0.18

South Richmond Hill

QN

120th St

94th Ave

Liberty Ave

0.53

Greenwich Village 

MN

Jones St

Bleecker St

W 4th St

0.09

East Village

MN

Ave B

6th St

14th St

0.39

Manhattan Valley

MN

103rd St

Broadway

Riverside Dr

0.16

Chelsea

MN

22nd St

8th Ave

7th Ave

0.16

Gramercy

MN

Irving Place

16th St

20th St

0.18

Kensington

BK

Chester Ave

Ft. Hamilton Parkway

Church Ave

0.32

Fort Greene

BK

Willoughby Ave

Washington Park St

Hall St

0.41

Crown Heights

BK

Park Pl

New York Ave

Kingston Ave

0.29

Crown Heights

BK

Troy Ave

St. Johns Pl

Eastern Parkway

0.10

Rego Park

QN

99th St

Horace Harding

66th Ave

0.52

Sunnyside

QN

50th Ave

48th St

44th St

0.19

Forest Hills

QN

66th Rd

110th St

Grand Central Pkwy

0.15

Prospect Heights

BK

Lincoln Pl

Washington St

Bedford Ave

0.41

Bed-Stuy

BK

Macon St

Arlington Pl

Tompkins Ave

0.40

Boerum Hill

BK

State St

3rd Ave

Smith St 

0.50

Homecrest

BK

16th St

Ave R

Moore Pl

0.11

Moore Pl

16th St

17th St

Brooklyn Heights

BK

Willow St

Middagh St

Pierrepont St

0.33

Seaport

MN

Front St

Beekman St

Peck Slip

0.08

Harlem

MN

117th

Morningside Ave

5th Ave

0.70

Chelsea

MN

21st St

9th Ave

10th Ave

0.16

Hells Kitchen

MN

51st St

9th Ave

10th Ave

0.16

Harlem

MN

138th

Lenox Ave

Adam Clayton Powell Blvd

0.15

Williamsburg

BK

N. 3rd St

Kent Ave

Metropolitan Ave

0.32

Brownsville

BK

Williams Ave

Liberty Ave

Atlantic Ave

0.11

Castle Hill

BX

Pugsley

Bruckner Blvd

Turnbull Ave

0.20

Maspeth

QN

60th Street

Laurel Hill Blvd

47th Ave

0.12

Forest Hills

QN

Ascan Ave

Queens Blvd

Austin St

0.07

Park Slope

BK

Butler St

Gregory Pl

4th Ave

0.14

Gregory Pl

Baltic St

Butler St

Bay Ridge

BK

Colonial Rd

86th St

83rd St

0.16

Jamaica

QN

107th Ave

159th St

160th St

0.03

Jamaica

QN

108th Ave

159th St

160th St

0.03

Jamaica

QN

159th St

108th Ave

109th Ave

0.12

Jamaica

QN

109th Ave

159th St

160th St

0.03

Total mileage

 

 

 

 

8.76

 

Adjacent Park Roads

Hunters Pt

QN

Center Blvd

57th Ave

Borden Ave

0.23

Green Central Knoll Park

BK

Noll St

Evergreen Ave

Central Ave

0.09

Plaut Triangle

QN

169th St

Northern Blvd

43rd Ave

0.03

Gorman Playground

QN

85th Street

25th Ave

30th Ave

0.13

Nicholas Naquan Heyward Park

BK

Wyckoff St

Bond St

Hoyt St

0.12

Charles Young Playground

MN

143rd St

Malcolm X Blvd

5th Ave

0.16

Stuyvesant Sq Park

MN

Rutherford Pl

15th St

17th St

0.09

16th Street

3rd Ave

Rutherford Pl

0.08

Morningside Park

MN

Morningside Ave

Manhattan Ave

116th

0.16

Yellowstone Park

QN

68th Rd

108th St

Yellowstone Blvd

0.10

Painter's Playground

QN

Dieterle Crescent

Alderton St

65th Dr

0.13

Carroll Park

BK

Carroll St

Court St

Smith St

0.10

McGolrick Park

BK

Russell St

Nassau Ave

Driggs Ave

0.17

Betsy Head Park

BK

Dumont Ave

Thomas Boyland St

Strauss St

0.14

Baisley Pond Park

QN

Barron St

116th Ave 

Foch Blvd

0.13

Lakeview Blvd E

118th Ave

122nd Ave

0.34

155th St

119th Ave

125th Ave

0.32

Lakeview lane

122nd Ave

Baisley Blvd

0.12

122nd Ave

Lakeview Blvd E

Lakeview Ln

0.08

Total mileage

 

 

 

 

2.72

 

In April, the Mayor and Council Speaker Corey Johnson announced that 40 miles of streets citywide would be opened by the end of May to allow greater social distancing, with a plan to expand to a total of 100 miles in the weeks and months ahead.

Under Open Streets, pedestrians and cyclists can use the roadbed of each street. No through traffic is permitted, with remaining vehicle traffic limited to local deliveries, pick-ups/drop-offs, necessary city service, utility, and emergency vehicles only. Such drivers are alerted to be hyper-vigilant and to drive at 5 MPH along these routes. Open streets hours will be from 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM but may vary slightly depending on staff availability.

The City has also begun installing nine miles of additional temporary dedicated cycling space, building on this March's addition of lanes on a section of Manhattan's 2nd Avenue and on Smith Street in Brooklyn. This week, crews began work on lower Broadway in Manhattan, 38th and 39th Streets in Manhattan, Crescent Street in Queens and Flatbush Avenue in Brooklyn. These temporary projects, which use barrels, signage, and other barriers, may be phased into permanent bike lanes as city resources come back online and as DOT gathers additional feedback from affected community boards and elected officials.

 “As the beautiful spring weather arrives, we invite New Yorkers to now safely enjoy over 40 miles of Open Streets and new bike lanes in neighborhoods across the city, including Brownsville, Brooklyn, Jamaica, Queens, and Castle Hill in the Bronx,” said NYC DOT Commissioner Polly Trottenberg. “We thank the NYPD and our sister agencies, BIDs and community groups as well as elected officials who have together helped us reach this point. We have more miles to come and continue to call on other neighborhoods that want an Open Street to let us know, even if you don’t have a formal community partner.”

“Opening up streets to people instead of cars is something that makes sense during the crisis,” said Manhattan Borough President Gale A. Brewer. “I’m glad that the administration has worked to quickly to add miles to the program.”

"Our neighbors in Castle Hill have taken a hard hit during this pandemic – residents need and deserve the additional space to safely enjoy the summer weather, while continuing to follow social distancing protocols. I am grateful to the Mayor's Office and the New York City Council for bringing the Open Streets initiative to Castle Hill, and look forward to its further expansion across District 34," said State Senator Alessandra Biaggi.

"New Yorkers are looking forward to Memorial Day weekend and more open streets will provide for more outdoor activity. While we must continue to maintain social distancing and wear masks in public, there will be more places for people to get out and enjoy the weather,” said Assistant Speaker Assemblyman Felix W. Ortiz.

“With the weather getting warmer, more people will inevitably go outside to enjoy the weather. We need to be sure that pedestrians and people enjoying parks are able to have adequate space to practice social distancing while outside. That's why opening more streets, such as 85th Street by Gorman Playground in East Elmhurst and 34th Avenue in Jackson Heights, makes sense. Thank you to the Mayor's Office and the Speaker's Office for this innovative project as we adjust to the realities of COVID-19,” said Assembly Member Michael DenDekker.

"Open Streets make New York City a healthier and more livable urban environment, and encourage New Yorkers to envision a city in which people, not cars, are the top priority in our streetscapes. We need more streets dedicated to walking, running, playing, cycling, and other free, carbon-neutral activities for people of all ages. Open Streets encourage us to imagine a city less reliant on automobiles and the traffic congestion and air pollution they cause," said Assembly Member Richard N. Gottfried.

"As we enter the summer months and the weather turns warmer, New Yorkers are going to be outside more and need creative ways to ensure social distancing. Opening our streets to pedestrians will help facilitate that and make coping with this crisis a little easier. I thank Mayor de Blasio for opening the streets and hope to see the continued success of this program,” said Assemblyman Walter Mosley.

"New Yorkers want to stay safe while they get fresh air during the holiday weekend, so I'm glad to see the City expand the open streets initiative," said Assembly Member Jo Anne Simon. "As we are all doing our best to be physically distant and to slow the spread, we need space for New Yorkers to get out and safely enjoy the warm weather. This crisis has highlighted our need to distribute street space more equitably, with pedestrians and cyclists taking precedent. I'm pleased to see the City respond to our neighbors need for open space as we continue to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic."

 “I am happy that the areas opening to pedestrian and cyclists are in the communities that were severely impacted by COVID-19. We must continue expanding this initiative to reach all underserved communities who have historically suffered at disproportionate rates from heart disease, asthma, and obesity. These communities are among the most vulnerable to the virus,” said Council Member Ydanis Rodriguez, Chairman of the Transportation Committee. “I ask my colleagues at the Council whose communities were not hit as hard to work with us to continue opening streets in low-income communities. I will continue working alongside Mayor de Blasio, Commissioner Polly Trottenberg, and advocates to continue opening streets for pedestrians and cyclists throughout the five boroughs.”

"I want to thank Mayor de Blasio and Commissioner Trottenberg for working with the Council to reach this 40-mile milestone for open streets in May. Now, we must turn our vision to expanding our open streets operations for the next 60 miles and more so that we can lift up community groups and bring needed infrastructure improvements such as bike lanes, sidewalk extensions and more to make New York a more open city," said Councilwoman Carlina Rivera.

“Neighborhood partners serve as the core of Open Streets. With the great partners we have in Bed-Stuy and Crown Heights, we can provide more open space to community residents and safely adhere to necessary social distancing practices. I welcome Open Streets, and I welcome a process that is inclusive and reaches out for community input. Thanks to all those neighborhood residents who engaged with us to advance Open Streets in Bed-Stuy and Crown Heights,” said Council Member Robert E. Cornegy, Jr.

"Kids in our neighborhoods have been thrilled to have a little extra space to play, and commuters and recreational cyclists are glad for additional routes with protection from nearby traffic. These additional blocks will help New Yorkers celebrate the warmer weather in safer, physically distant ways. I'm grateful to the Administration and the DOT for working to get these programs running across our city, and hope to continue working with you to ensure equitable citywide implementation that creates more open space and safer transit options in all neighborhoods, especially those that have been hardest hit by the health and economic impacts of the pandemic,” said Council Member Brad Lander

"After spending weeks indoors, open and clean streets is what New Yorkers deserve. This new mile of open streets in Red Hook will allow my neighbors to have the space to walk, watch their kids play, and adhere to social distancing. I look forward to working with the Mayor and community partners to reclaim our streets for pedestrians and cyclist,” said Council Member Menchaca, Chair of the Committee on Immigration.

"As we keep opening streets, more New Yorkers can safely get outside. I look forward to the continued use of street space for pedestrians and cyclists as we work in new ways to get around our city. Thanks to the Times Square Alliance and the Alliance for Kips Bay for their partnership in this effort,” said Council Member Keith Powers.

"Sunnier days have arrived and more of our New Yorkers will be out seeking recreation in our parks and green spaces in the coming weeks," said Council Member Paul Vallone. "Creating a temporary Open Street on the road adjacent to Flushing's Plaut Triangle will provide residents more space to safely enjoy warmer weather and facilitate important social distancing."

“I’m excited to see Center Blvd, adjacent to amazing parks that can get crowded, being opened to pedestrians and bikers as part of our City’s “Open Streets” program,” said Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer. “Turning streets into public spaces is the type of bold change we need to see right now, and Hunters Point/LIC residents will be able to play and safely social distance while demonstrating how needed this is.”

Organizations wishing to have other New York City streets considered for the Open Streets program should reach out to fill out an online survey. More information is available at nyc.gov/openstreets.

pressoffice@cityhall.nyc.gov

(212) 788-2958