2018 Code Revision and Interpretation Committee Code Interpretation
(Last Updated: August 20, 2020)


In an effort to help the electrical industry make a smooth transition into the new Electrical Code and ensure the continuity in the performance of electrical work, the Department of Buildings will be posting code interpretations on its website. Listed below are new code-related questions and corresponding interpretations by the Code Committee. The users of this list should have available the 2008 edition of the NEC and the associated NYC Amendments to the 2008 NEC , as well as (Local Law 39/11) that went into effect on March 1, 2012.

To learn more about what each CHAPTER/topic is about, click on the chapter number. To find questions on the related topic, click on the topic or section Code.


CHAPTER 1: General (Section 110.1 to 110.79)
CHAPTER 2: Wiring and Protection (Code Section 200.1 to 285.28)
CHAPTER 3: Wiring Methods and Materials (Code Section 300.1 to 398-104)
CHAPTER 4: Equipment for General Use (Code Section 400.1 to 490.74)
CHAPTER 5: Special Occupancies (Code Section 500.1 to 590.7)
CHAPTER 6: Special Equipment (Code Section 600.1 to 695.14)
CHAPTER 7: Special Conditions (Code Section 700.1 to 770.182)
CHAPTER 8: Communications Systems (Code Section 800.1 to 830.179)
CHAPTER 9: Tables (Table 1 to 12(B))
Articles: A subdivision of a Chapter, comprised of a certain number of Sections
Administrative: General Requirements

All interpretations are based on the 1999 NEC and associated NY City amendments.*

Whenever there are a few sections referenced, the first one is the "lead section", and the rest are secondary sections. All the secondary sections are referenced with the purpose of offering additional clarifications.**

 

Chapter 1: General (Section 110.1 to 110.79)

Section 110.26(A)(1) - (2/22/2018)

Q: The attached Life Safety room layout consist of 480V Automatic Transfer Switches (ATS), 480V Manual Transfer Switch (MTS), Remote Terminal Unit (RTU), Remote Control Unit (RCU), transformers and panelboards. The 480V MTS and 480V ATS are front accessible enclosed equipment that are across from the RTU and RCU. The RTU and RCU are low voltage communication enclosed equipment intended for start/stop control signals for the ATS. This communication equipment consists of a fiber connection with standard120V plug-in connection for Ethernet ports (see attached).

Per NEC 2008 handbook, live parts are defined as energized conductive components and are associated with all voltage levels, not just voltage levels that present a shock hazard.

Are the RTU and RCU considered live parts?

The ATS and RTU have 3'7" of working clearance in between the equipment and the MTS and RCU has 3'11" of working clearance in between the equipment.

Does this satisfy the requirement of table 110.26 (A)(1), condition 2?

A: Yes, if there are no energized parts when the cabinet covers of the RTU and RCU are open or removed

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Sections 110.26, 110.34(A) – (4/9/2018)

Q:

  1. Does 230.64(B)(1) apply to systems that are higher voltages like 5KV and 15KV?
  2. Or does table 110.34(A) apply?
  3. The wording of the code is "switchboards" but the advisory board approved job when there was only 36" in front of the service end box and C.T. cabinets and switchboards with second devices in them. But in retrospect when there was individual standalone service switches for example a 400 amp service switch that was part of a 1000kva installation the advisory board required 5 Ft. clearance in front of it.
  4. Does a standalone service switch that is part of a 1000kva installation require 5 Ft. clearance in front?
  5. Does a switchboards with second devices in them that is part of a 1000kva installation, require 5 Ft. clearance in front?

A:

  1. Yes if they are service equipment totaling over 1000kVA, additionally, the larger distance required by subsections 230.64(B)(1) or 110.34(A) shall apply.
  2. Yes, see answer to No. 1.
  3. The requirement of 230.64(B)(1) is applicable to service switches only regardless of location.
  4. Yes.
  5. No, when the switchboard section contains only distribution OCPD (second level OCPD).

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Subsection 110.2(B) – (6/4/2018)

Q: The fire occurred in an existing building caused by the utility company street cables. Due to the fire damage, the existing Service End Box (SEB) with copper detail and load side feeders feeding the existing service/distribution equipment were damaged beyond repair. Service and distribution equipment was not damaged. The scope of work which was filed with the New York City Bureau of Electrical Control included replacement of the existing SEB in place and feeders in kind, matching the existing rating, materials and routing.

We refer to Local Law #39 of the City of New York of 2011, Chapter 1, Article 100, Requirements for Electrical Installations, Section 110.2 (B).

In our interpretation of the above referenced code section, the replacement of the existing SEB and load side feeders in kind and in place do not require submission of documents to Advisory Board for approval. Please provide clarification for the following:

  1. Is submission required for approval of proposed replacement of the Service End Box and load side feeder in kind and in place?
  2. If submission is required, what documents are required to be submitted?

A:

  1. Submission is required for services 1000KVA or higher, or above 600V.
  2. For documentation, please refer to 1 RCNY 34-05 (updated rule 1 RCNY 4000-01)

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Subsection 110.26(C)(2) – (6/4/2018)

Q: When the code omits a second egress door, does it require to double the workspace based on table 110.26 or is it based on the 5Ft. rule in 230.64 (B) (1)?

A: When doubling the workspace is required it shall be based on table 110.26; unless 7ft clearance is required between service switches facing each other.

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Subsection 110.14(C) – (10/1/2018)

Q: We are running a Fire Pump feeder using Draka cable. In the Service room and the Fire Pump room both 2 hr fire rated we are using Ridgid pipe and THHN cable and will splice to the Draka cable. Can we use the 90 degree rating of the cable, as crimp connectors are rated 90 degrees, for the run between the rooms.

A: Yes, where the ampacity does not exceed the THHN portion of the Fire Pump Circuit.

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Subsection 110.26(A) – (10/1/2018)

Q: As part of a renovation of an existing 160 unit 16-story apartment building, is it permissible to do a one-to-one replacement of an appliance panelboard located adjacent a movable oven? The intent is to clarify if article 110.26 (A) (1) (c) is met in an existing building where working space for a panel is created by removing an oven.

A: No. Subsection 110.26(A)(1)(c) is not applicable to your installation.

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Section 110.2 – (12/3/2018)

Q: NYC DEP North River Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) was constructed on a platform built over the Hudson River. The WWTP was originally constructed as a Group D-1 (Moderate Hazard) Industrial Occupancy Group with a Class 1A Fire Proof construction under the 1968 New York Building Code (NYCBC) which translates to a Factory and Industrial Group F-1 (Moderate Hazard) occupancy under 2014 NYCBC.

The Cogeneration and Electrification Project (Project) at North River WWTP will install five (5) new cogeneration engine generators. The cogeneration engine generators will operate either in island mode or in parallel with the electrical utility. The cogeneration engines will produce approximately 12 MWe power at 4160V. To protect the WWTP’s existing electrical equipment that is not being replaced under this Project, under a fault condition when paralleling with the electrical utility, Medium-Voltage Air Core Reactors (Reactors) will be installed per the attached one-line drawing. The Reactors will be installed indoors within the WWTP’s Electrical Substation and dedicated Electrical Room.

The design and fabrication of Air Core Reactors are customized to the required application. Per my understanding and review of the following Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratories: Underwriters Laboratories Inc. (UL), Factory Mutual Engineering Corp. (FMRC) and Canadian Standards International, Inc. (CSA), there is no standard for Medium-Voltage Air Core Reactors to be certified to and tested against.

Section 110.2 of the 20011 NYC Electrical Code is interpreted that all electrical equipment shall be listed by a Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory. Given there is no specific test standard for Air Core Reactors, is this equipment required to be Labeled or Listed?

A: All electrical equipment used in NYC shall be approved by the commissioner, either listed equipment or testing results by a third party documenting safety.

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CHAPTER 2: Wiring and Protection (Code Section 200.1 to 285.28)

Section 210.52 – (2/22/2018)

Q: We are renovating a kitchen in a NYC condominium apartment and are getting conflicting information about outlets required in a kitchen island.

The new island will be freestanding, approximately eight feet by 42 inches, and have a small prep sink.  There will be more than twelve inches behind the prep sink to the end of the island.

  1. Do we require more than one outlet in this island, either due to the 8 foot length or the definition of a single continuous countertop space?
  2. Is the outlet or outlets required to be on the short end of the island?
  3. Is it permitted to have the outlet on the long end of the island (above cabinetry but with only 1-2 inches of stone overhang)?

A:

  1. No.
  2. No.
  3. Yes.

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Section 225.30(D) – (2/22/2018)

Q: Two Buildings are located on the same property under single management. 208 volt Utility power POE and service disconnect switches are located in building #1. Power for building #2 is supplied at 480 volts via step up transformer, 2000A 480V Switch and feeder on the load side of the service disconnecting means located in building #1. An increase in building #2 demand load above the capacity of the existing 480 volt 2000 amp service requires additional utility power to be provided from building #1. To meet the current demand an additional 208V, 400amp feeder would be required. Based on Article 225.30 (D) additional "feeders" would be allowed.

Questions related to Article 225.30 (D):

  1. If the demand load reaches a point were more utility power is required, can a third feeder be brought over to building #2?
  2. Is there a limit to the number of additional feeders that can provide utility power to building #2, once the capacity of the 2000amp service has been exceeded?

A:

  1. Yes, with a special permission.
  2. No.

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Section 240.21 – (2/22/2018)

Q: Quick question on 10' tap rule.:
What should be minimum size of feeder to tap from main service switch and what should be the size of Fusible disconnect switch and its fusing in such case. Please refer to
attached layout in question.

A: Where the tap is connected to the load side of the 2000 amp service switch, it shall be sized at 10% of the upstream OCPD. See 240.21(B)(1).

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Subsection 240.24(B)(2) – (2/22/2018)

Q: We are planning a new 7 story facility with dwelling units to be transiently occupied for a period less than one month. The facility is intended to provide boarding for women and children in need. The building has been classified and filed as R1 with the building department.

The units will be furnished with a two burner electric cook-top intended for warming purposes only (see attached cut). We are proposing that all branch circuiting within the units be wired from a common house panel in the hallway on a floor by floor basis as is customary for transient hotels and boarding houses. These common panels shall be under continuous 24 hour building management supervision and shall be accessible only to authorized management personnel. It is desired for safety reasons, and for the protection of the electrical equipment, that the population within the dwelling units not be given access to any panel, panelette, or branch circuit protection device.

To that effect, we will complying with NEC 2008 section 240.24(B)(2) in lieu of 240.24(B). Is this acceptable? Please advise.

A: No. Your proposed installation does not meet the condition of subsection 240.24(B)(2).

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Section 210.52(I) – (4/9/2018)

Q:

  1. When the AC unit is the form as it’s known "PTAC" which is a packaged terminal air conditioner unit, that is installed below the window in a hole thru the wall, and is cord & plug connected to the air conditioner outlet (as required in 210.52(I). Is this also part of this same section and can be calculated as such?
  2. Does this rule also include "PTAC" units that operating on 208 Volts 1 Phase and one can add 1500VA for each 2-wire AC circuit to the calculations?

A:

  1. Yes, if this equipment is a packaged unit and with cord.
  2. Yes, see answer above.

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Subsection 215.2(A)(1) – (4/9/2018)

Q:

  1. Is a purpose of NYC Electrical Code Subsection 215.2(A)(1) addressing voltage drop maximum values for feeders and feeders with branch circuit to establish the following?
    1. Feeders
      1. Are the voltage drop values at the feeder last overcurrent device to be not more than 3% which are 446.2V and 201.67V for 460V and 208V systems respectively?
    2. Feeders plus branch circuits
      1. Are the voltage drop values for connected loads to be not more than 5% which are 437V and 197.6V for 460V and 208V systems respectively?
  2. If the answer for the above question 1.b is yes, please see the following question.
    1. Is it acceptable to exceed 3% feeder voltage drop total calculated value for feeders consisting of 460V feeder, step down transformer and 208V feeder serving 208V panel via provided the following condition is met?
      1. Transformer taps are utilized for maintaining 208V panel last overcurrent device voltage values at not less than 201.67V.
  3. Is it acceptable to exceed 3% feeder voltage drop values in cases where branch circuits are very short (e.g., elevator machine rooms, small mechanical rooms, etc. where branch circuits are about 5 to 15 feet long) provided the feeders plus branch circuits voltage drops are not more than 5% in order to maintain not less than 437V and 197.6V load voltage values for 460V and 208V systems respectively?

A:
1.a.i. Yes.
1.b.i  Yes.
2.a.i. No. transformer taps shall not be used to adjust voltage drop.
3. Yes.

Notes:
1. Refer to NYC Energy Conservation Code (ECC) when projects are subject to NYC ECC compliance.
2. The answers above don’t address the voltage values used by the question.

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Subsection 240.24(B)(2) – (4/9/2018)

Q:

  1. Does table 230.42 apply to bus bars in service equipment when the installation is less then 1000KVA?
  2. Does table 230.42 apply to bus bars in equipment which is connected on the load side of a separately derived system less then 1000KVA?
  3. Does table 230.42 apply to bus bars in equipment which is connected on the load side of a separately derived system over 1000KVA?
  4. Does table 230.42 apply to bus bars in equipment which is connected on the load side of a generator that is not a separately derived system and is less then 1000KVA?
  5. Does table 230.42 apply to bus bars in equipment which is connected on the load side of a generator that is a separately derived system over 1000KVA?

A:

  1. Yes for the scope of bus bars covered in subsection 408.60(E)(2).
  2. Yes, see answer for No.1.
  3. Yes, see answer for No.1.
  4. No, since a generator is not a service and subsection 408.60(E)(2) is applicable to separately derived systems only.
  5. Yes, see answer for No.1.

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Sections 250.66, 250.122 – (4/9/2018)

Q: When a 30 amp fused switch is installed for a fire alarm system with 15 or 20 amp fuses, and the ungrounded (phase) conductors are #12 AWG.

Can the grounded (neutral) conductors also be the same size #12 AWG?

A: Yes, see subsection 250.24(C) for service switch and 760.49(A) for branch circuits.

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Section 210.5, 215.12 – (6/4/2018)

Q: Can you please direct me to where in the NYC 2011 Electrical Code I can find the rule for color coding current carrying conductors? I do not see this addressed in the NEC Code and so typically the AHJ has a bulletin or amendment to clarify.

Below is a rule of thumb but I am looking for something in writing from the Electrical Department of NYC. 120/240V, single-phase — black, red, and white

120/208V, 3-phase — black, red, blue, and white
120/240V, 3-phase — black, orange, blue, and white
277/480V, 3-phase — brown, orange, yellow, and gray; or, brown, purple, yellow, and gray

A: The 2011 NYC electrical code requires identifications for the ungrounded conductors, grounded conductors and equipment grounding conductors that shall be identified in accordance with section 210.5 and 215.12.

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Section 210.12 – (6/4/2018)

Q: We are being asked to look at a new project where the engineer is requesting that the foyer lights in the apartments be backed up from an emergency (EM) panel located in a panel outside of the apartment. Does this circuit need to be arc fault protected?

A: Overcurrent protection devices serving a dwelling unit shall be readily accessible to tenants and Arcfault protection devices are required.

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Section 210.12 – (6/4/2018)

Q: The apartment building has a Verizon NID box in one closet of each apartment. The inspector objected to the receptacle not being AFCI protected. It is our contention that the receptacle doesn't require AFCI protection because:

  1. the NID box has a cover, making the receptacle inaccessible to the tenant. Only the modem is connected and the only time the cover will come off is if a qualified Verizon technician needs to test or replace the modem.
  2. the receptacle is in a metal box, fed by a Type AC (BX) individual branch circuit. Thus, while 210.12 Exception 3 deals specifically with a fire alarm system; the exemption should seemingly apply here, too.

A:

  1. Yes, AFCI protection is required on all new branch circuits that are 15 or 20 amp and 120 nominal voltage in accordance with 210.12
  2. No, the exception is for smoke detection (system connected devices).

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Sections 210.8 & 210.12 – (8/6/2018)

Q:

  1. Do we have to protect laundry circuit (washer or gas dryer) with ARC fault breaker?
  2. Do we have to provide ARC fault breaker for outlets in the laundry area/room?
  3. Is it allowed to put none GFI protected 120V 20 or 15 Amp simplex receptacle for the sewer pump in the mechanical room?
  4. Is it allowed to put none GFI protected 120V 20 or 15 Amp power receptacle for the Tel/Data equipment in the mechanical room?
A:
  1. Yes, if the circuit is 120 volt, single phase, 15 or 20 amps branch circuits in a dwelling unit.
  2. Yes, if it is as described above.
  3. Yes. See 210.8.
  4. Yes, unless equipment is used for emergency calls.

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Section 210.52 – (8/6/2018)

Q: There is NOT communal laundry (washer/dryer) in the basement of our co-op building.
And no washer/dryer units are to be installed in our unit.
Are we required to include a circuit for washer/dryer in a load letter even if we have no intention of installing?

A: No, a laundry circuit is not required where it’s not permitted by the coop building. See section 210.52(F) Exception No. 2

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Section 250.66 – (8/6/2018)

Q: Table 250.66

  1. I would like an explanation of the notes 1 and 2 to this table.
  2. Is the size of the required GEC to the grounding electrode based on the sum of all the service conductors, if there is more than one service disconnect or switchboard, or is it based on the largest set of service conductors to one disconnect or switchboard?
  3. Since we run the GEC for each Service Disconnect to a common collector bus, on what is the size of the conductor to the grounding electrode based upon from this bus?
  4. On what is the size of the GEC from a separately derived system based on? Again, is it the largest secondary feeder conductor or the sum of all feeder conductors from a transformer, or the sum of all conductors from a generator or the largest?
  5. Note 2 is also ambiguous by referencing the largest equivalent service conductor.

A:

  1. For Note No. 1: A grounding electrode conductor (GEC)shall be sized for the total sets of the service entrance conductors entering the premises.
    For Note No. 2: Where service busbars are used, then the GEC is sized on the equivalent size of service conductors required to supply the load.
  2. If the GEC is made at a common point, then it shall be sized based on the total service conductors that entering the building. Where GEC is connected to separate service switches, then the GEC is sized based on the total ungrounded service conductors serving the service switch, see 250.64(D)(1), (2) or (3).
  3. See answer for No. 2.
  4. Section 250.30(A)(1) requires that the GEC shall be sized based on the derived phase conductors, or when run with the derived phase conductors from the source to the first disconnecting means, it shall be sized in accordance with 250.102(C).
  5. Where service busbars are used, then the GEC is sized on the equivalent size of service conductors required to supply the load.

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Subsection 230.42(A)(2) – (10/1/2018)

Q: Do we have to cable to the frame size of service switches 800A or less on services 1000 KVA or more on the line side of these switches?

A: No. NYC Electrical Code 230.42(A)(2) applies to service switches above 800 Amps.

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Section 230.64 – (10/1/2018)

Q: We are working on a project with a unique condition where the cellar of the building is below the flood plain. In compliance with Appendix G of the building code, we are locating the electrical service room on 2nd floor above the floor level. Con Edison is providing us with two (2) 3000A 120/208V take offs. We have two (2) service end boxes in the cellar that take Con Ed feeders, transition to fifteen (15) sets of 750MCM AL feeders and go up to 2nd floor service equipment in concrete encased FRE conduits. The building is a high-rise residential and has a fire pump as well a generator that's picking up the fire pump and other emergency and standby loads.

Please answer the following two questions.

  1. Do the service end boxes in the cellar have to be in dedicated 2 hour rated rooms?
  2. If the answer to the first question is a NO, do the service end boxes themselves have to be 2 hour rated?

A:

  1. Yes
  2. N/A

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Section 250.64 – (10/1/2018)

Q:

A1. Can the GEC be installed with other conductors in the same raceway?
A2. Does it need to be associated with the circuit in some manner?
B.  Can it be installed in a stairwell?
C.  Can it be installed with emergency circuits in the same raceway?

A:

A1. Yes
A2. No
B. No
C. No. Emergency circuits are not permitted to share conduits and pull boxes with other circuits.

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Section 250.66 – (10/1/2018)

Q: Table 250.66 bases the size of the GEC on the largest set of service entrance conductors and allows for multiple sets of service conductors. A note says that this table also applies to separately derived systems using the size of the derived conductors. 250.30(4) applies to multiple separately derived systems.  Part (a) says that the minimum size for the GEC shall be 3/0 when connected to more than one separately derived system. Does this mean that when more than one transformer is involved, we skip the table and just use 3/0?

A: Multiple separately derived systems shall be connected to 3/0 AWG in accordance with 250.30(A)(4)(a).

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Section 210.8 – (12/3/2018)

Q: I’m installing a commercial kettle and the instruction is to provide Type C GFCI receptacle outlet or Type A GFCI circuit breaker device. The question is what is Type C device is protecting? Equipment or Personal?

A: UL 943 Class C GFCI is for personal protection.

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Subsection 210.19(A)(1) – (12/3/2018)

Q:

  1. In Section 210.19(A)(1) is the requirement for the maximum voltage drop for panel feeders calculated based on 80% of the circuit breaker current rating?
  2. In Section 210.19(A)(1) is the requirement for the maximum voltage drop for panel feeders calculated based on the actual connected or continuous load?
  3. In Section 210.19(A)(1) is the requirement for the maximum voltage drop for branch circuits calculated based on 80% of the branch circuit breaker current rating?
  4. In Section 210.19(A)(1) is the requirement for the maximum voltage drop for branch circuits calculated based on the actual continuous or connected load?
  5. In Section 210.19(A)(1) is the requirement for the maximum voltage drop for Sub-panel feeders connected to the third level OCP calculated based on 80% of the circuit breaker current rating?
  6. In Section 210.19(A)(1) is the requirement for the maximum voltage drop for Sub-panel feeders connected to the third level OCP calculated based on the connected or continuous load?

A:

  1. No. It is based on the demand load of your feeders and/ or branch circuits.
  2. See answer above.
  3. No. It is based on the demand load of your branch circuits.
  4. No. It is based on the demand load of your feeders and/ or branch circuits.
  5. No. It is based on the demand load of your feeders and/ or branch circuits.
  6. No. It is based on the demand load of your feeders and/ or branch circuits.

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Section 220.12 – (12/3/2018)

Q: In calculating load summaries for a remodeling of a space, the lighting loads installed and required by energy code are often much less than the Lighting Load values required per Table 220.12.

Using the example of a high-rise office building remodeling a space with existing electrical conductors installed that provide 380 Amps to the space: The installed lighting load per the energy code is about 1 watt per square foot, and the remaining mechanical, plumbing, and power equipment sum the total load for the space to less than 380 Amps. However, using the Table 220.12 lighting loads for an office building of 3.5 Watts per square foot has the effect of raising the load above 380 Amps, artificially requiring additional feeds to the space where they would otherwise not be required. It’s worth noting that 3.5 Watts per square foot is more than half of the wattage allowed by many lease languages within Manhattan, generally 6 Watts per square foot. Can the Electrical/Architectural Consulting Engineering community within the New York City area for remodeled spaces regard the lighting load as: The maximum allowed wattage per the energy code, instead of attributing the values indicated in Table 220.12?

A: NYC energy code power densities use Real Power (watts) and to limit the use of electrical power consumption, the NYC electrical code power densities use apparent power (VA) and to adequately size branch circuits and feeders with the provision for future expansion. New York city electrical code does not prohibit someone from using less power.

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Section 250.102 – (12/3/2018)

Q: NEC 250.102(C ) introduces the 12.5% rule of thumb for size of the equipment bonding jumper. Within the rule, it states that the 12.5% shall be based upon an ampacity equivalent to that of the installed phase conductors. NYC code provision 230.42 introduces the service busbar ampere density.

  1. Should the grounding conductor in a 4000A service switchboard be based on the 4000A rating (12.5% x 4000A = 500A resulting in a 1/4"x2" copper ground bar)?
  2. Should the grounding conductor in a 4000A service switchboard (where 4-1/4"x6" copper is being used to meet 230.42) be based on the density rated conductors (12.5% x 4 laminations x .25" thick x 6" wide = .75 resulting in a 1/4"x 3" copper ground bar)?

A:

  1. No. the size of Equipment Bonding Jumper on the supply side of service over 1100 kcmil copper of 1750 kcmil is 12½ % of the service entrance phase conductors’ cross section.
  2. Yes.

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CHAPTER 3: Wiring Methods and Materials (Code Section 300.1 to 398-104)

Section 300.19(A) – (2/22/2018)

Q: We have to install 110 feet of 4inch conduit with 600 MCM aluminum wires installed in a vertical run. This run will have 4pc of 90 degree installed in the middle of this run.
Do we have to install additional cable supports for this conduit run?

A: No. Since the vertical conduit lengths are not required support per Table 300.19(A).

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Section 330.12 – (2/22/2018)

Q: Per 2011 NYC EC, section 330.12 (4), PVC coated MC cable is not allowed in residential buildings exceeding three floors above grade. However, section 330.12 (5) allows the use of PVC coated MC cable for non-residential buildings when installed concealed behind non-plenum, 1-hr fire rated assemblies.

  1. Can we use the exception for 330.12 (5) for residential buildings exceeding three floors above grade? In other words, can we install PVC coated MC cable in residential buildings exceeding three floors above grade if concealed behind non-plenum, 1-hr fire rated assemblies?
  2. If we install PVC coated MC cable inside the concrete slab form (1hr fire rated assembly), can we stub-up in a non-rated wall assembly to feed a receptacle or appliance for a maximum length of 18-inch.
  3. If we install PVC coated MC cable inside the concrete slab form (1hr fire rated assembly), can we stub-up in a non-rated wall assembly to connect to the panelboard for a maximum length of 72-inch.
  4. If (b) or (c) is not allowed, can we use an UL listed 1-hr thermal barrier wrap around the PVC coated MC cable stub-ups described on (b) and (c) above to comply with the requirement of 330.12 (5). See attachment

A:

  1. Yes.
  2. Yes. 18” of maximum PVC jacket MC cable shall be permitted to be installed in the wall cavity to terminate into receptacle outlet.
  3. No.
  4. If the product is listed for use intended.

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Section 338.10 – (2/22/2018)

Q: An independent school is currently undergoing a multi-year renovation/expansion project.  During the summer of 2018, the building will be occupied only by approximately 15 – 20 office staff members and the construction crew working on the project. Work scheduled for the summer includes the removal of  the existing life safety generator, which currently provides power to the fire alarm system, emergency egress lights, the fire pump and elevators,  and replacing it with a larger unit.  During the time frame that the existing emergency generator is offline until the new generator is commissioned and ready for operation, (approximately 6-8 weeks), the GC will be providing a sidewalk mounted temp generator to support the above noted life safety systems in the event of a power outage.

Since the temp generator installation will support the facility for such a short period of time we would like to provide a feeder of SE cable from a main disconnect at the generator to an emergency power switchboard and then energize the fire pump and fire alarm system from branch breakers in this panel utilizing SE cable as well for these temp feeders.  Will this temporary installation be acceptable?

A: Yes, when the SE cable used has equipment grounding conductor and sized in accordance with the overcurrent protection device it’s serving. The installation shall be in accordance with NYC Electrical Code, Article 590.

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Section 362.10(3) – (2/22/2018)

Q: per code section 362.10 (3) is it permissible to use 1.5" ENT tubing concealed in a sheetrock (NON-PLENUM) ceiling in an apartment building that is fully sprinkled?
See
attached.

A: No. One hour of thermal barrier shall be provided.

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Sections 314.19, 314.23(A) – (4/9/2018)

Q: May a single gang device box be installed behind a 1/8" steel plate (which is hard wired with AC Cables) of permanently installed desk partitions and the receptacle will be accessible by removing the 4 screws that is supporting the steel plat to the vertical steel tubes?

Please see sketches and photos of this partition in question.

A: No. the installation is in violation with subsection 406.4(A).

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Section 330.10(A)(3) – (4/9/2018)

Q: May Vita Link 2-Hour fire rated MC Cable (UL FHIT 120) be installed and running outdoors?

A: No. See subsection 330.10(A)(3).

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Section 310.15 – (6/4/2018)

Q: There are three sets of single phase 208Volt feeders with common neutral (totaling 7 conductors) occupying single conduit serving three apartments. Does the neutral count as a current carrying conduct as per Art: 310.15(B)(2) and Art: 310.15(B)(4)?

A: The determination of current carrying conductors shall be I accordance with 310.15(B)(4).

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Subsection 310.15(A) – (6/4/2018)

Q: When calculating conductor sizes for temperature adjustment factors and for more than three current carrying conductors in a raceway,

  1. can one use the maximum calculated load of the circuit?
  2. or do i have to use the size of the OCPD?

A:

  1. Yes, see subsection 310.15(A)
  2. No, OCPD size is irrelevant to the conductor ampacity.

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Sections 330.30(D)(1), 330.30(A) – (4/9/2018)

Q:

  1. 330.30(D)(1) is it permitted to use MC cable in the vertical shaft in finished building, where there is no access for supports? There can be supported at the top and bottom only?
  2. 330.30(A) is it approved method to support MC cable in the no accessible shaft to use hanging steel cable with supporting claps/straps and attached to the MC cable every 6 feet? The steel cable to be supported at the top of the shaft.

A:

  1. Yes, the maximum unsupported length shall be in accordance with the manufacturer certification and UL 1569.
  2. Yes.
  3.                                                                                                                                                                               

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Subsection 352.10(G) – (10/1/2018)

Q: Can we use Schedule 40 PVC under a slab for service conductors? Do the elbows under the slab have to be ridged metal conduit?

A: Yes. For services conductors, only non-PVC conduit is acceptable by the utility. For feeders, NYC EC section 352.10(G) permits the installation of schedule 40 and 80 PVC in concrete. UL lists PVC conduit under product code DZYR.

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CHAPTER 4: Equipment for General Use (Code Section 400.1 to 490.74)

Section 410.10(D) – (2/22/2018)

Q: The contract calls for low voltage LED strip lighting to be installed in a cove near the floor on the side of the bathtubs. The wiring from the power supply to the LED flex strip is 2 conductors #16 GA with 300 volt insulation which falls within the guidelines of the power supply. Our concern is that a person in the bathtub can touch the LED strip.

Attached are the specification of this installation:

  1. LED flex strip
  2. 300 Watt remote power supply
  3. Flex mini channel with lenses
  4. Drawing showing 2 elevators of the bathtub with the LED strip lighting

Is this installation Code Compliant?

A: The installation of this LED lighting shall be permitted when it is complies with section 411.3(B); that all of the system components are listed.

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Subsection 408.60(A) – (6/4/2018)

Q:

  1. Does this rule also apply to service panelboards?
  2. Does this rule also apply to stand alone service switches?
  3. Does this rule also apply to non service switchboards that are feed from a separately derived system?

A:

  1. No.
  2. Yes, unless it meets the exception.
  3. No.

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Section 430.250 - (8/6/2018)

Q: Table 430.250

1-The note at the bottom of the table says:
"For 90 and 80 percent power factor, the figures shall be multiplied by 1.1 and 1.25, respectively"
This in effect makes us go to the nameplate of the motor. Since the power factor is not on this nameplate and the amperage is usually less than the table amperage and no motor has a 100 percent power factor this table is confusing and somewhat useless even though the code makes us use it (except for elevators and HVAC equipment} and to ignore the nameplate. What power factor should we assume? Is it ok to just take the table value since it is always high?

A: The power factor adjustment factor is applicable for Synchronous-Type Unity Power only.

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Section 430.24 – (10/1/2018)

Q: We are trying to size elevator feeders for multiple motors in elevator rooms. We have 7 rooms and each have 2 or 3 motors. We have no idea how to apply 430.24 Exception (1) to table 430.22(E) Duty Cycle Service.

A: Refer to Annex D, Example D9.

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Section 430.250 – (10/1/2018)

Q: We had an inpection this week and the Inspector said that the feeder size and disconnect size for the Fire Pump should be based on the nameplate rating of the Fire Pump motor. It is my understanding that we need to use Table 430.250 for all motors except elevators where we use the nameplate of the motor.

A: The table value from T430.250 shall be used. Refer to August 2018 meeting minutes.

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CHAPTER 5: Special Occupancies (Code Section 500.1 to 590.7)

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CHAPTER 6: Special Equipment (Code Section 600.1 to 695.14)

Section 695.4(B)(3) – (2/22/2018)

Q: In a NYC commercial high-rise building, the existing feed to a 200HP fire pump is supplied by service which located within the service switchboard (there are 6 service switches in the switchboard, one of which feeds the fire pump). The fire pump does not presently have a connection to an alternate power source (generator or other). We would like to provide an alternate power source for the fire pump by installing a new automatic transfer switch (ATS) with Emergency source connection to a single, existing emergency generator in the building, and re-feed the existing fire pump via the load terminals of the ATS.

  1. Can we re-use the existing service switch located in the service switchboard, that is presently feeding the fire pump, to feed the Normal source of the fire pump ATS?
    Or,
  2. will we be required to install a new service disconnecting means separate from the service switchboard, per: NYCEC 695.4(B)(3) & (4)?

A:

  1. Yes, if there are no electrical or modification for the fire pump switch or wiring in the main electric room, and you are only extending the existing fire pump feeder in the fire pump room to the new fire pump ATS.
  2. See answer above.

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Section 695.5 – (8/6/2018)

Q: Per code 695.5, secondary protection, (means of disconnect or over-current protection) on fire pump step up transformers are not permitted. Does New York electrical code amendments require the secondary disconnect?

A: No, see 2011 NYC Electrical Code amendment 695.5(A)(2).

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Section 695.5 – (8/6/2018)

Q: Per code 695.5, secondary protection, (means of disconnect or over-current protection) on fire pump step up transformers are not permitted. However, my fire alarm vendor says it is required and the FDNY will requested it.

Can you please confirm if the FDNY has jurisdiction to supersede BEC code?

A: No, secondary overcurrent protection shall not be permitted, see 2011 NYC Electrical Code amendment 695.5(A)(2).

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Section 645.10 – (10/1/2018)

Q:

  1. In a 2 hr. rated main electrical closet, do the service feeders from a copper detail to a fire pump meter and then TO the fire pump service disconnect switch located in the same room have to be in RGC?
  2. If NO to (A) is EMT allowed?
  3. If Yes to (A), service feeders traveling through a trough than tapping out with RGC to the Meter allowed?

A:

  1. Yes. Mechanical protection for supply conductors is required and all wiring methods listed under section 695.6(A) are permitted.
  2. N/A.
  3. Yes, see answer in (A) above.

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CHAPTER 7: Special Conditions (Code Section 700.1 to 770.182)

Sections 700.12 and 760.41 – (2/22/2018)

Q: An existing building is classified as an A Occupancy with over 1,000 occupants and the building is 40'-0" in height. The new fire alarm system for the building will have an emergency voice communication system for live voice messages. There is (1) elevator that will not be used as an accessible means of egress. Chapter 27 of the NYC Building Code references NFPA 110 (Standard for Emergency and Standby Power Systems) and NFPA 111 (Standard on Stored Electrical Energy Emergency and Standby Power Systems). Chapter 27 does not state the type of emergency power system (battery or generator) to be used for required emergency or standby systems. Section 700-12 (A) and 700-12 (C) states that storage batteries and uninterruptible power supplies may be used for emergency lighting and may be used for other systems where Special Permission is granted. There is a Fine Print Note under 700-12(A) that states to refer to Article 760 for use of batteries for fire alarm system.

Article 760-41 discusses secondary power sources for the fire alarm system. If a generator is installed in the building we must use the generator system as the secondary source in addition to batteries for the fire alarm system. We interpret that if a generator system is not required for the building to power other emergency or standby systems, batteries can be used as the sole source for secondary power for the fire alarm system.

Question: Is Special Permission required to use batteries or an uninterruptible power supply as the secondary source for a fire alarm system when a generator system is not required to serve other emergency and standby systems?

Question: Is a generator required to be installed to serve the fire alarm system even though no other emergency and standby power systems are installed?

A:
Q1. Fire Alarm requires its own dedicated battery backup with or without code required alternate power source such as generator. If there is a justified hardship, a special permission may be submitted to the department.

Q2. Yes, unless a justified hardship exist and can be demonstrated.

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Section 760.41 – (2/22/2018)

Q: The following questions pertain to an existing school campus consisting of multiple academic buildings that are owned and operated by a single Owner. The attached sketch makes reference to three buildings in particular, Buildings “A”, “B” and “C”, where Detail 1 represents existing site conditions and Detail 2 represents the planned construction changes.

Detail 1 (Existing Conditions) - Building “A" is served by an existing 120/208V-3 phase Con Edison incoming service. This same service provides power to building “B” via underground feeder to a 2nd level distribution board containing a main circuit breaker. The feed to the existing fire alarm system (FAS) in building “B” is tapped ahead of the distribution board main circuit breaker via fuse cutout located in the same building.

Detail 2 (Planned Construction Changes) - The school is constructing a new building “C” that will be physically interconnected with building “B”. Building “C” is going to have its own (new) incoming electrical service 265/460V-3 phase from Con Edison, life safety generator and fire alarm system. In addition, the existing fire alarm system in building “B” is being redesigned and replaced in its entirety in accordance with the 2014 NYC Building Code and filed separately from the building “C" FAS. It is planned to feed power to both the building "B" and building "C" FAS's from a common electrical power distribution system, derived from one ATS unit. Understanding that both the normal and emergency power sources for this FAS will be tapped ahead of any service switches, we have the following question:

Question: Would it be permissible to power the new FAS in building “B" from the building “C" incoming service and life safety generator, while continuing to receive main electrical service from building “A"? This assumes that a single set of service taps and dedicated fire alarm ATS unit would be used to serve the FAS’s in both buildings.

A: Yes, when the FA ATS is installed remote from the primary and secondary power sources, generator is installed in rated room, and emergency and standby are installed in accordance with NYC Building Code, Chapter 27. Feeders for more than one building shall be subject for section II requirements of article 225

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Sections 760.53 and 760.46 – (2/22/2018)

Q:

  1. Is type MC VITALink MC brand, fire resistive cable as listed under UL System No. 120 permitted to be used as NPLFA? Is a separate equipment ground conductor with green insulation required for this cable?
  2. Is MI cable that is listed as UL System No. 1850 permitted to be used as NPLFA? Is a separate equipment ground conductor with green insulation required for this cable?

A:

  1. MC VITALink cable is acceptable when listed and complies with NYC electrical code, including but not limited to the following;
    1. Equipment grounding requirement shall be in accordance with subsection NYC EC 250.118(10)(a) or (b).
    2. For fire alarm applications, MC VITALink cable is only permitted to be used in accordance with section 760.53 as CI cable where survivability for NPFA circuits are required by codes.
    3. Where equipment ground conductor is required to be increased for voltage drop or paralleling applications, the equipment ground shall be increased accordingly.
    4. MC Vitalink cable is a listed system with specific components, and shall be installed in accordance with the listing and the manufacturer’s instructions.

  2. MI cable is acceptable when listed and complies with NYC electrical code, including but not limited to the following;
    1. Equipment grounding requirement shall be in accordance with section NYC EC 332.108.
    2. For fire alarm applications, MI cable is permitted to be used for primary power in accordance with 760.46 and in accordance with section 760.53 as CI cable where survivability for NPFA circuits are required by codes.
    3. Where equipment ground conductor is required to be increased for voltage drop or paralleling applications, the equipment ground shall be increased accordingly.
    4. MI cable is a listed system with specific components, and shall be installed in accordance with the listing and the manufacturer’s instructions.

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Sections 760.41(D), 517(B)(4), 517.32(C) – (4/9/2018)

Q: NYC electrical code amended section 517.30(B)(4) to require a separate transfer switch for "Alarm and alerting systems". Is it permitted for a transfer switch to supply both a fire alarm system and an alarm system associated with piping system for medical gases?

The question is asked since the scope of Article 760 is limited to fire alarm system, and Section 760.41(D) requirement is for a dedicated automatic transfer switch to the fire alarm systems. It does not mention any other alarm system. However, Article 517.30(B)(4), as well as 517.32(C) do not appear to prohibit both types of alarm systems to be supplied by the same transfer switch since both are classified in the life safety branch category.

A: No. Fire Alarm wiring shall be separated from all other wiring.

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Section 760.130(A) – (4/9/2018)

Q: May THHN or THWN conductors installed inside 3/4" EMT be used for a fire alarm system wiring for the SLC & NAC circuits, instead of the FPL, FPLR, FPLP, ‘NYC certified fire alarm cable’?

A: Yes, see subsection 760.130(A) references sections 760.46 and 760.49(B).

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Section 760.41 – (10/1/2018)

Q: We received an LOD on a project from the Fire Department during inspection requiring the service disconnect switch to the fire alarm system on the emergency side to be moved closer to the location of the ATS. The ATS is currently located in a separate room from the EPS equipment. The fused disconnect switch is located at the EPS equipment. We interpret the NYCEC Code requirements of the location of the fire alarm disconnect to be incline with our design. It is our interpretation that the disconnect switch must remain at the point of emergency service cannot be relocated. Is this correct?

A: Yes. Location of the Fire Alarm fused disconnect by the EPS equipment is in accordance with NYC Electrical Code requirement and is not required to be relocated.

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Section 760.46 – (10/1/2018)

Q: Does all Fire Alarm non power-limited circuits have to be in RMC or IMC? We see EMT all the time for FACPs, DGPs and Strobe panels.

A: Yes. NYCEC Section 760.46 permits wiring methods described in Articles 342(IMC) and 344(RMC) or use of Type MI Cables in accordance with Article 332(IMC). EMT is also acceptable where used for feeders and branch circuit above 8ft in mechanical spaces or where it is indoor and not subject to physical damage.

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Section 700.9 (B) – (12/3/2018)

Q: See attachment, questions are as follows:

  1. Is 18AWG shielded general purpose plenum-rated cabling routing free air in plenum spaces above hung ceilings an approved wiring method for emergency lighting systems?
  2. Is 18AWG shielded general purpose plenum-rated cabling routing in electrical metallic tubing above hung ceilings an approved wiring method for emergency lighting systems?
  3. Regardless of (a) and (b), the final connections at the switches and light fixtures will not be able to be in any sort of conduit given the practical limitations with conduits and final terminations without benefit of junction boxes. Is this an acceptable wiring method?
  4. Regardless of (a) and (b), does serving emergency lighting via 18AWG shielded general purpose plenum-rated cabling deriving from a Cisco switch meet the code intent?

A: (a) through d) are not permitted under current NYC Electrical Code, additionally only Chapter 3 wiring methods and listed equipment are permitted in NYC.

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Subsection 705.12(D)(1) – (12/3/2018)

Q: Just in case, the specific question regarding 705.12(D)(1) and whether a new solar system installed on a building with an existing solar system would be considered two separate systems or not. The building is a single structure with one meter, but over two separate block and lots. The developer is considering a new sub-panel on the rooftop for the new system, or would need to interconnect across the roof at the existing system’s subpanel depending on the code interpretation.

A: Individual overcurrent protection device (OCPD) is required for each PV system, and permitted to be connected to the load side of the same or different service disconnecting means.

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Sections 760.130 and 760.131 – (12/3/2018)

Q: We respectfully request a reconsideration on this and pose the following questions:

  1. Is it permissible for PLFA cable to be run in free air above 8ft in Mechanical Rooms and Elevator Rooms 900 sq. ft. and greater?
  2. Is it permissible for PLFA cable to be run in free air above 8ft in Mechanical Rooms and Elevator Rooms less than 900 sq. ft. in area? See attached.

A: For 1 and 2: No, the previous interpretation still stands. Please refer to the referenced code sections since it is specifically amending the mechanical room installation.

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CHAPTER 8: Communications Systems (Code Section 800.1 to 830.179)

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CHAPTER 9: Tables (Table 1 to 12(B))

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ARTICLES

Article 90.2(B) - (12/3/2018)

Q: Do the NYC Electrical Code requirements apply to installations of Electrical Power on platforms of NYCTA Subway Stations?

A: No. NYCTA is a State Authority and shall comply with NY State Electrical Code. See NYC Electrical Admin Code 27-3006 and NYC Electrical Code Section 90.2(B).

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Article 90.2(B) - (12/3/2018)

Q: Should work done in the Subway Stations of NYCTA, LIRR, MTA and MNR comply with the New York City Electrical Code and its amendments?

A: No. The listed agencies are State Authority Agencies and shall comply with NY State Electrical Code. See NYC Electrical Admin Code 27-3006 and NYC Electrical Code Section 90.2(B).

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Article 90.2(B) - (12/3/2018)

Q: Can the installation of Electrical Power and Lighting be done NYCTA Subway Stations in compliance with only the National Electrical Code and not the New York City Electrical Code?

A: No. NYCTA is a State Authority and shall comply with NY State Electrical Code. See NYC Electrical Admin Code 27-3006 and NYC Electrical Code Section 90.2(B).

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Article 90.2(B) - (12/3/2018)

Q: Is Section 210.19(A)(1) a mandatory requirement when work is being done in the New York City Transit Subway platforms and stations?

A: No. NYCTA is a State Authority and shall comply with NY State Electrical Code. See NYC Electrical Admin Code 27-3006 and NYC Electrical Code Section 90.2(B).

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Article 90.2(B) - (12/3/2018)

Q: Is Section 210.19(A)(1), as added to the NYC Electrical Code, a mandatory requirement when work is being done in New York City?

A: Yes. For installations that are subject to NYC Electrical Code.

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Article 230 – (6/4/2018)

Q: Con Edison will be bringing power for a building in the Bronx to a property line box. After that it will be my firm’s responsibility to bring 12 sets of 600 MCM to the electrical room to feed the electrical service.

My question is as follows: Can I run concrete encased 4-inch PVC conduit to electrical room from the property line box to feed the building?

A: The utility company (Con Edison) has a current electrical service installation standard that does not permit PVC up to the first disconnecting means. See attached referenced.

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Article 500.00 - (10/1/2018)

Q: An existing space was originally unclassified and EMT was used as a wiring method, the space will be Classified to house Class I, Division II (Group D). We are prposing to cut back the EMT within 12” where they enter the space, and terminate in Type C Combination EMT/Rigid Conduit Body with Cover and Gasket, then seal both end of the conduit body with un-spliced conductors. Is the described installation method meets the code intent?

A: No.

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Articles 695 & 700 – (6/4/2018)

Q: We are questioning if it is acceptable to install a fire pump controller with integral ATS provided by the fire protection contractor when the fire pump is fed with only utility power, no emergency power. Would it be an objection to install and use this switch with no emergency power present?

The installation will take place in a R-2 occupancy building, with Building Department permits filed under the 2008/2014 NYC Building Codes.

The fire pump is fed from a switch in the main service room, with feeders tapped directly off of the service buss detail in the CT cabinet before all other switches and over-current protection, and that leave the switch and run directly to the fire pump controller.

A: Using ATS with only primary power source is acceptable when manufacturer provides documentation that such setup will not cause any operational problems.

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Articles 695 & 760 – (8/6/2018)

Q:

1. Can a meter that is dedicated to feed a fire pump also be used to feed a fire alarm system and share the same meter?

2a. Can a fire alarm system be fed from a dedicated meter?

2b. Can a fire pump be fed from a dedicated meter?

3. Can you tap out from a fire pump service entrance conductor (on the line side before the fire pump meter) to feed a meter for a fire alarm system and service disconnect?

4. Can you tap out from a fire pump service entrance conductor (on the load side of a meter) to feed a fire alarm system service disconnect?

If the answer to question 3 & 4 are Yes, please describe the means and methods on how the taps are allowed to be done.

A:
1.   Yes.
2a. Yes.
2b. Yes.
3.   Yes
4.   Yes, as long there are no Overcurrent Protection Device is installed in same cabinet or section that the Fire Pump connection is made in.

Note: We provide electrical code interpretation only. For means and methods, please retain the service of a registered professional engineer.

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Article 695.5 – (8/6/2018)

Q: When calculating the Fire Pump circuit conductor size, is the FLA provided by the manufacturer on the Fire Pump’s nameplate or the full load current current from table T430.250 to be used?

A: The full load current from 430.250 shall be used. Section 430.6(A)(1) requires the use of tables to determine the ampacity of the conductors for other than low speeds or high torques, and multispeed motors. Additionally, The NEC handbook provides additional clarification under the calculation examples in section 695.4.

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Article 702, BC 27 – (4/9/2018)

Q: In a high rise residential multifamily dwelling building, a generator will be installed to feed the required emergency and standby loads.

In addition the owner wants to provide an optional standby circuit to feed each apartment's refrigerator, (with an FLA or 6.5 Amps) and one receptacle (installed on the edge of the kitchen peninsula), and the under-cabinet LED lights.

Please note that there are already other receptacles on the kitchen countertops that are feed by the 2 required small appliance circuits, and this is an additional circuit which is not one of the required circuits.

Is this installation acceptable?

If no, please explain why, and i would appreciate an alternative solution.

A: Optional standby load shall be served by separate transfer equipment and wiring in accordance with Article 702 and Building Code, Chapter 27, section 2702.4. Additionally, lighting shall be served with by a separate branch circuit and shall not be connected to the small appliance circuit that being provided for the optional loads.

Note. Each occupant shall have a ready access to all overcurrent devices to the occupancy; see subsection 240.24(B).

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Articles 702 & 705 – (6/4/2018)

Q:

1. If a combined heat & power unit (CHP) is installed and will NOT operate when its primary source (utility) is lost:
(a) Does it need to meet the requirements of 2011 NYC Electrical Code Section 705 - Interconnected Electric Power Productions Sources?
(b) Does it need to meet the requirements of 2011 NYC Electrical Code Section 702 - Optional Standby Systems?

 

2. If a combined heat & power unit (CHP) is installed and has an inverter (with batteries) and black start capability, and the CHP WILL operate when its primary source (utility) is lost:
(a) Does it need to meet the requirements of 2011 NYC Electrical Code Section 705 - Interconnected Electric Power Productions Sources?
(b) Does it need to meet the requirements of 2011 NYC Electrical Code Section 702 - Optional Standby Systems?
(c) If the CHP will provide power to optional standby loads (ex. lighting that already has 90 minutes of battery back-up to meet Emergency requirements, and other optional loads), does that change the answer to 2(a) or 2(b)?
(d) If the CHP unit is not large enough to support all 'Emergency' loads, does that change the answers to the above?

A:
1.(a) Yes, when power production source operates in parallel with primary electric source.
1.(b) No.
2.(a) Yes.
2.(b) Yes.
2.(c) No.
2.(d) No. but the unit has to comply with NYC Building Code, Chapter 27 and Chapter 17 special inspection requirement for emergency power.

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ADMINISTRATIVE: General Requirements

Rule 1RCNY 12-01 – (4/9/2018)

Q: We are replacing sixteen (16) existing, 1990’s vintage, emergency power transfer switch (ATS) units at a college campus with new ATS units. The existing ATS units are seeing increasing levels of operational and maintenance issues and have exceeded their useful life expectancy. The planned replacement ATS units will be the same size, will be re-connected to the same circuiting, and the plan is to install them in the same physical building locations as the existing ATS units. The existing ATS units are currently located in electric rooms that also contain normal building service equipment.

  1. Since this is in-kind replacement of the existing ATS units with no increase in power capacity, can the existing ATS switches be replaced with new ATS units in the same physical building locations?"

A: Not enough information was giving in the question. The exact electrical filing date determines if this installation was in compliance with rule 1RCNY 12-01 at the time of filing, hence will be permitted to be replaced in-kind.

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Copies of the NYC 2011 Electrical Code (only the amendments to the NEC 2008 Electrical Code) and the New York City Electrical Code (the amendments and the NEC 2008 Electrical Code) can be purchased at the CityStore.


Other Code Interpretation Links: