History

  • 1965: The Older Americans Act creates a nationwide aging network.
  • Late 1960s-early 1970s: The NYC Mayor's Office for the Aging is created as a three-year project. The Office conducts groundbreaking research on the needs of urban older adults, opens four service sites, and pioneers a half-fare transit program.
  • 1973: The Office becomes a national Area Agency on Aging.
  • 1975: The Office becomes the New York City Department for the Aging (DFTA). Alice Brophy is the first Commissioner.
  • Mid-late 1970s: Senior centers and nutrition programs expand. DFTA also expands to support in-home, transportation, senior employment, foster grandparent, legal, and elder abuse services.
  • 1980s: Under Commissioner Janet Sainer, DFTA develops the Intergenerational Work-Study Program, senior center health programs, the first Alzheimer's disease counseling service provided by a municipality, Citymeals on Wheels, and the nonprofit Aging in New York Fund.
  • Early-mid 1990s: DFTA launches its Health Insurance, Information, Counseling, and Assistance Program and becomes the first municipality to create a Grandparent Resource Center.
  • 1992-1993: The New York City Human Resources Administration transfers its senior centers to DFTA.
  • Late 1990s: Oversight of programs at existing naturally occurring retirement communities (NORCs) in the City now fall under DFTA.
  • 2005: The City of New York wins a "Livable Communities" award from the federal Administration on Aging for its work with NORCs.
  • 2009: The City launches Age-friendly NYC with nearly 60 initiatives.
  • April 2016: DFTA launches a graphic ad campaign showing elder abuse and receives feedback from organizations in the U.S. and abroad.
  • July 2016: DFTA releases the Aging in Place Guide for Building Owners: Recommended Age-Friendly Residential Upgrades.
  • Mid-late 2016: Through ThriveNYC, DFTA launches the Geriatric Mental Health Initiative counseling program and the Friendly Visiting Program.
  • 2017: DFTA launches Age-friendly NYC: New Commitments for a City for All Ages with nearly 90 initiatives.