Reports

Guide to Community and Neighborhood Resources

The NYC Department for the Aging (alternately referred to as NYC Aging, DFTA, or the Department) has compiled six documents/tables to serve as a resource for organizations and individuals who have a need for social and demographic indicators and other information concerning older New Yorkers. Depending on the particular document/table, the data are arrayed at the city, borough, community district (CD) and/or neighborhood tabulation area (NTA) levels. Following is a description of these resources:

Profile of Older New Yorkers.

This document is the most wide-ranging among the six, providing 12 data elements at the city, borough and CD levels. As such, it provides the broadest snapshot of social indicators and other information that together define basic characteristics of the NYC older population at several levels of disaggregation, including:

  1. Total Number and Percentage of People Aged 60+ and 65+
  2. Gender
  3. Number of People Aged 60+ Living Alone
  4. Race/Ethnicity 60+
  5. Number and Percentage below 100%, 125%, 150%, and 200% Federal Poverty Level
  6. Number and Percentage below 100%, 125%, 150%, and 200% CEO Poverty
  7. Employment Status
  8. Educational Attainment
  9. Immigrants 60+: Foreign Born
  10. Top Seven non-English Primary Languages
  11. SNAP 60+ (received last 12 months
  12. Mobility and Self-Care

Download Profile of Older New Yorkers


Annual Plan Summary.

This document is particularly useful in two ways. It provides a great deal of trend data related to the older NYC population. It also provides a yearly update of notable initiatives, projects and program enhancements underway within the Department for the Aging.

Download Annual Plan Summary 2020


Demographics by Neighborhood Tabulation Area (NTA).

Given that NTAs generally comprise geographic areas smaller than community districts, this table provides a more micro-level snapshot of basic data than are often available. Data from this table can thereby be of value to those wishing to define basic demographic information within smaller neighborhood areas, including data on the size of the 65+ population, the number of people 65+ living in poverty, and the race/ethnicity breakout of the NTAs.

Download Demographics by Neighborhood Tabulation Area (NTA)


Limited English Proficiency (LEP) by NYC Community District.

Given the diversity of the NYC older population, having information concerning people who do not speak English well, and knowing the number of such people by language, is critical to tailoring outreach and services to people living within any particular CD. This table lists each of the City’s 59 CDs and shows which, if any, languages within that CD are spoken by a substantial number of residents who do not speak English well.

Limited English Proficiency (LEP) by NYC Community District


Current Capacity Average Daily Participants and Projected Capacity Needed in 2030, for NYC Aging-funded Older Adult Centers, by Community District.

Using NYC Department of City Planning data, this table shows for which CDs the Department is projecting High Growth (as defined on the table), Medium Growth, or Lower/No Growth between 2020 and 2030. As such, the table can be of use as a guide for organizations currently offering services and/or applying for funds to offer some form of social programming targeting older people, in order to guide such organizations in suggesting where programs should be located or expanded in size, for example, to accommodate projected high CD growth./p>

Download Current Capacity Average Daily Participants and Projected Capacity Needed in 2030, for NYC Aging-funded Older Adult Centers, by Community District


Accessibility of Older Adult Centers (Senior Centers) and Transit Resources to Older New Yorkers.

Certain older New Yorkers are disadvantaged by virtue of being a considerable distance from a senior center and/or a bus or subway, and/or both. This can limit their ability to take advantage of services and activities that can promote health and well-being. It can also lead to social isolation, with its compounding effects on physical and mental health and overall well-being. NYC Aging believes that it is critical for aging services programs to connect with seniors who are distant from an aging services resource and/or a transit resource. This is particularly the case with older adult centers because many people would likely avail themselves of valuable services and activities multiple times per week at centers that are accessible to them. Thus, it is important for those who operate or wish to operate an older adult center to connect with older people through effective outreach to them coupled with the offer of resources to help them easily get to the center in question. The Accessibility document will help organizations to pinpoint people living in specific Census blocks where they are distant from a nearby senior center (more than 0.50-mile radius) and/or from a subway or bus (more than 0.25-mile radius).

Download Accessibility of Older Adult Centers (Senior Centers) and Transit Resources to Older New Yorkers