Press Release

For Immediate Release:November 10, 2020
Contact: lpcpressoffice@lpc.nyc.gov, (212) 669-7938

LPC Designates the Angel Guardian Home in Dyker Heights as an Individual Landmark

This architecturally distinctive building serves as a reminder of the important role played by religious social service organizations in Brooklyn's early 20th century history.

Photo of the Angel Guardian Home in Dyker Heights

NEW YORK – Today, the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) designated the Angel Guardian Home at 6301 12th Avenue in Dyker Heights, Brooklyn as an individual landmark. This architecturally distinctive building serves as a reminder of the important role played by religious social service organizations in Brooklyn's early 20th century history.

“The Angel Guardian Home, the first landmark in Dyker Heights, is a highly prominent building that is both architecturally and historically significant,” said Landmarks Preservation Commission Chair Sarah Carroll. “The combination of its sophisticated architectural style, its grand presence within the neighborhood, and its historic importance as a social services institution in Brooklyn distinguishes the Angel Guardian Home.”

The Angel Guardian Home was built as an orphanage in 1899 and was operated by the Sisters of Mercy as a branch of their convent in Clinton Hill. It was designed by George H. Streeton, a prominent architect of Catholic churches in New York City. He blended Renaissance Revival and Beaux-Arts-style elements, styles that were in popular use at the time, to impart a sense of grandeur or civic purpose to the building. The Angel Guardian Home features ornate carved limestone door surrounds, quoins, arched windows, copper cornices, and mansard roofs evoking the sophistication of European architecture. Prominently elevated on a raised lawn surrounded by a historic stone wall, the elegantly designed building stands out within the surrounding low-scale residential streetscape.

The Sisters of Mercy operated the Angel Guardian Home in Dyker heights for close to 120 years, as an orphanage and residence for unwed mothers until the 1980s and later offering senior assisted living. The monumental brick and limestone structure, which occupies a full block of 12thAvenue, remains intact and is symbolic of the importance given to social services in the Progressive Era, and of the role the Sisters of Mercy have played in Brooklyn for over a century.

“Preserving the Angel Guardian Home has been a top priority of mine since taking office and I thank the Landmarks Preservation Commission and local community activists for their tireless work in helping make this day a reality,” said Council Member Justin Brannan. “I am proud to see that Dyker Heights will now have its first officially landmarked building. This special designation will ensure that neighbors and all New Yorkers will be able to cherish this majestic and historic building in its original state for generations to come.”

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About the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC)

The Landmarks Preservation Commission is the mayoral agency responsible for protecting and preserving New York City’s architecturally, historically and culturally significant buildings and sites. Since its creation in 1965, LPC has granted landmark status to more than 37,000 buildings and sites, including 1,438 individual landmarks, 120 interior landmarks, 11 scenic landmarks, and 150 historic districts and extensions in all five boroughs. For more information, visit www.nyc.gov/landmarks and connect with us via www.facebook.com/NYCLandmarks and www.twitter.com/nyclandmarks.