Press Release

For Immediate Release: December 8, 2021
Contact: lpcpressoffice@lpc.nyc.gov, 212-669-7938

LPC, NYLPF, Council Member Louis and Residents Celebrate the Designation of the East 25th Street Historic District With a Historic District Marker

Historic district markers feature a map highlighting the boundaries of the district and a brief description of its historic importance.

 

New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) Chair Sarah Carroll, New York Landmarks Preservation Foundation (NYLPF) Chair Tom Krizmanic, Council Member Farah Louis and residents of the East 25th Street in East Flatbush pose in front of the historic district marker attatched to a lamp post
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) Chair Sarah Carroll, New York Landmarks Preservation Foundation (NYLPF) Chair Tom Krizmanic, Council Member Farah Louis and residents of the East 25th Street in East Flatbush are looking up and point at the historic district marker attatched to a lamp post

NEW YORK – Today, New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) Chair Sarah Carroll, New York Landmarks Preservation Foundation (NYLPF) Chair Tom Krizmanic, Council Member Farah Louis and residents of the East 25th Street in East Flatbush unveiled a historic district marker that will serve to promote and commemorate the designation of the East 25th Street Historic District in Brooklyn. The newly installed marker, located mid-block in front of 336 East 25th Street, highlights the boundaries of the district and its historic importance.

 “The Commission designated the East 25th Street Historic District last year to recognize both the architectural quality and the residents' incredible stewardship of their historic homes and their block,” said Landmarks Preservation Commission Chair Sarah Carroll. “The installation of these historic district markers will memorialize the Commission’s designation of this historic district—the first in East Flatbush—and let New Yorkers and visitors alike know about East 25th Street’s architectural and historic importance.”

“New York City is built block by block, and these blocks contribute to the fabric of the communities that inhabit them –strengthening the City as a whole,” said Landmarks Preservation Foundation Chair Tom Krizmanic. “The East 25th Street Historic District preserves the history and heritage of these treasured architectural homes, and the past, current and future generations of residents and neighbors who will see them through time.”

The marker installation is part of the NYLPF’s Historic District Marker Program, which fosters public awareness and civic pride in designated historic districts in the five boroughs through signage. A total of two markers, funded by LPC, have been installed on each side of the East 25th Street Historic District.

The newly installed markers are 19-by-36-inch terra cotta-colored signs and feature a map on one side and a brief description and history of the district on the other. The marker text reads as follows:

“The East 25th Street Historic District is an unusually intact and cohesive group of 56 row houses built between 1909 and 1912. Developed by German immigrant Henry Meyer, this block’s long, unbroken Renaissance Revival-style rows are especially distinctive for this section of Flatbush. Each house has either a limestone or brownstone front and angled or rounded bay,
with both sides of the street mirroring each other. Since the 1970s, the district has become home to many African American and Afro-Caribbean families, whose remarkable community spirit is visible in both the lush greenery of their award-winning gardens and in the outstanding integrity of these homes.”

“I am proud to represent Council District 45, which now includes the first-ever Historic Landmark District in Flatbush,” said Council Member Farah N. Louis. “The designation of the East 25th Street Historic District is a testament to the power of neighbors working together to preserve the integrity of their community. By protecting the Renaissance Revival-style rowhouses along East 25th Street between Clarendon Road and Avenue D, we are ensuring that future development does not demolish and forever erase the history of this neighborhood. It is so important that the resiliency of our city and cultural diversity remains unshakeable. I want to thank the East 25th Street Block Association and the Landmarks Preservation Commission for collaborating with my office to ensure that future generations can cherish such irreplaceable architecture.”

“Today celebrates a culmination of the intersection between history, honor and inspiration,” said Julia Charles, founder of the East 25th Street Historic Initiative. “These historic district markers highlight and celebrate the developer, architects, craftsmanship and residents who have made this block special from its inception to present day. The markers will emphasize our historic achievement for generations to come and hopefully encourage other preservation efforts.”

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About the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC)

The Landmarks Preservation Commission is the mayoral agency responsible for protecting and preserving New York City’s architecturally, historically and culturally significant buildings and sites. Since its creation in 1965, LPC has granted landmark status to more than 37,500 buildings and sites, including 1,445 individual landmarks, 121 interior landmarks, 11 scenic landmarks, and 152 historic districts and extensions in all five boroughs. For more information, visit www.nyc.gov/landmarks and connect with us via www.facebook.com/NYCLandmarks and www.twitter.com/nyclandmarks.

About the New York Landmarks Preservation Foundation (NYLPF)

The New York Landmarks Preservation Foundation is a not-for-profit organization that supports work that relates to the designation of New York City landmarks, including the well-recognized Bronze Plaque Program for individual landmarks, the Street Sign Program, and the Historic District Marker Program. For more information, visit http://www.nylpf.org/.