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Welcome to the
Mayor’s Office of Information Privacy

The Mayor's Office of Information Privacy, headed by the City's Chief Privacy Officer, leads the City government's policy initiatives and legal strategy to protect residents' privacy and the confidentiality of their personally identifying information. MOIP supports the Administration's efforts to expand equity and opportunity by facilitating responsible data-sharing arrangements as part of multi-agency initiatives to improve coordination of and access to benefits and services.

The Importance of Privacy

The City of New York collects and uses “identifying information” from members of the public to deliver government services such as public benefits, education programs, and health services, among many other services and resources. This information is also often critical to evaluating the effectiveness of City programs.

“Identifying information” means any information obtained by or on behalf of the City that may be used on its own or with other information to identify or locate an individual. The City’s definition of identifying information, as set out by local law, is very broad so as to provide maximum protection to individuals’ personal information. Examples include Social Security numbers, photographs, biometric information, employment status, motor vehicle information, and IP addresses, among many other types. A full definition of identifying information and a list of the enumerated types of identifying information can be found in Section 3 of the Citywide Privacy Protection Policies and Protocols.

With the support of the Chief Privacy Officer and the Mayor’s Office of Information Privacy, the City integrates stringent privacy protection standards and requirements with responsible data-sharing to provide important services and resources. As technology continues to develop and electronic transactions become more prevalent, the need for robust privacy protections and protocols—such as those set forth in the Citywide Privacy Protection Policies and Protocols of the Chief Privacy Officer—is even more important to protecting individuals’ sensitive personal information.

Privacy Principles

The City of New York has a responsibility to safeguard the identifying information collected and maintained by its agencies while also fulfilling its mandate to provide important services and resources to its residents. Our five Privacy Principles provide a framework of privacy standards which demonstrate our ongoing commitment to build public trust in government and to use data to deliver services and resources equitably and effectively.

Accountability

City agencies should establish and implement agency privacy protection policies and protocols, develop strategies and plans to periodically assess and modify such practices as privacy and security threats emerge and evolve, and guide their covered contractors and subcontractors in such efforts.

Public Trust

City agencies and their covered contractors and subcontractors should collect, use, retain, and disclose identifying information in a manner that protects individuals’ privacy interests to the greatest extent reasonable under the circumstances so that all members of the public can seek and safely access needed City services and resources, trusting that the City is appropriately safeguarding their personal information.

Responsible Governance and Stewardship

In delivering necessary City services and striving to improve outcomes for its residents, City agencies and their covered contractors and subcontractors should appropriately protect the privacy and security of identifying information so that such information is used, collected, accessed, stored, and disclosed or otherwise shared only with authorized persons for lawful purposes.

Data Quality, Integrity, and Accuracy

City agencies should endeavor to maintain identifying information in a manner that protects its quality, integrity, and accuracy. Agencies should take reasonable steps to ensure that inaccurate or outdated identifying information is corrected, updated, or, where appropriate, securely disposed.

Request for Input on Privacy Protection Practices

The CPO welcomes input from stakeholders on how the City can best serve the public's privacy interests while continuing to advance the programs and services that aid New Yorkers every day.

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