Rent Stabilized Building Lists

Buildings That Contain Rent Stabilized Units

On this page, you will find general guidelines for identifying if your apartment may be rent stabilized.

You will also find links to downloadable listings of buildings in New York City that contain rent stabilized apartments and how to use these tables most effectively. The tables do not list which apartments in these buildings are rent stabilized, only those buildings that contain at least one rent stabilized unit (per owner registrations). A link is also provided to NYS Homes and Community Renewal’s (HCR) searchable database of buildings that may contain rent stabilized units.

Note: The NYC Rent Guidelines Board does not have any information concerning whether any particular apartment is rent stabilized.

Click a topic, or press the enter key on a topic, to reveal its answer.

How to Tell If a Building Is Rent Stabilized

How to tell if a building contains at least one rent stabilized unit:

In general, stabilized buildings

  • Contain 6 or more units;
  • Were built before 1974;
  • Are not co-ops or condos;

However, not all apartments in these buildings are necessarily rent stabilized. For an apartment to be stabilized it should:

  • Have had a rent of less than $2,000, if a tenant initially moved into the apartment between 1993 and June 23, 2011.
  • Have had a rent of less than $2,500, if a tenant initially moved into the apartment between June 24, 2011 and June 14, 2015.
  • Have had a rent of less than $2,700, if a tenant initially moved into the apartment since June 15, 2015. (Also see this FAQ). 
  • Have had a rent of less than $2,733.75, if a tenant initially moves into the apartment after December 31, 2017. (Also see this FAQ). 
  • Have had a rent of less than $2,774.76, if a tenant initially moves into the apartment after December 31, 2018. (Also see this FAQ)

There are many exceptions to these rules. (For instance, if you moved into the apartment before the building was converted to a co-op, the apartment may be stabilized. Also, some newly constructed buildings may be stabilized due to a 421-a or J-51 tax exemption even if the rent is $2,000 or more.)

The lists on our website only include buildings whose owners registered with the NY State Homes and Community Renewal (HCR). If an owner filed after the lists were compiled or not at all, a building may not be on our lists but may still contain rent stabilized apartments.

The only way to know if your apartment is rent stabilized is to contact NYS Homes and Community Renewal (HCR), the state agency which administers the rent laws.

Information about deregulation may be found on HCR's page on Deregulation as well as their page on Deregulation Rent and Income Thresholds on HCR's website.

Additional explanatory information on rent stabilization may be found in HCR Fact Sheet #1: Rent Stabilization and Rent Control and in our FAQ section on rent stabilization.

How to Use the Rent Stabilized Building Listings

  1. Buildings are grouped by zip code. Within each zip code, buildings are sorted first by street name and then by building number.

  2. Some buildings have multiple addresses. If a building has two addresses (e.g. 415 E. 52nd, also known as 404 E. 53rd), both addresses are in the list. 

  3. The lists also indicate some additional information about the building if it was available:

    • Co-op or condominium status: If the building is a co-op or condominium, renters who move in AFTER the conversion date are NOT protected by rent stabilization regulations.

    • 421a or J-51: Buildings which are listed as "421-a" or "j-51" are stabilized because they took advantage of the 421-a or J-51 tax exemption program. These buildings remain rent stabilized for the length of the tax exemption, and thereafter may be deregulated if the buildings were not stabilized prior to the participation in the tax exemption program.

    • Multiple Dwelling Class: Hotel or Rooming House/Class B Multiple Dwelling status indicates a multiple dwelling which is generally occupied transiently. A Class A Multiple Dwelling generally is occupied as a permanent residence and are mostly apartment houses.

    • Type of Structure: hi-rise, garden complex, etc.

    • A list of definitions of Rent Regulation and Building Status terms as well as a further explanation of buildings contained on these listings can be found on the HCR Web site.

  4. The lists do NOT include owner information. However, you can find owner information, as well as a wealth of other building-specific information, on these NYC.gov web sites:

NYC Rent Stabilized Building Listings

  • Listings are in pdf format. If you are unable to view the pdf, download the Adobe reader for free. If you are having trouble installing or using the Adobe reader, please see their troubleshooting page.
  • If you are looking up a particular building and are not sure of its zip code, you can find it on the U.S. Postal Service website.
  • A list of definitions of Rent Regulation and Building Status terms, as well as a further explanation of buildings contained on these listings, can be found on the HCR Web site.

Manhattan 

Brooklyn 

Bronx 

Queens 

Staten Island 

Data Source: 2017 Building Registrations filed with NYS Homes and Community Renewal (HCR).

Statewide Rent Regulated Building Search on HCR's Website